« Archives in September, 2011

Jellyfish "watch' established in the Mediterranean…

Deadly: A Portuguese Man o’ War like this one killed a woman off the coast of Italy

The jellyfish “watch” scheme started in Italy and Israel three years ago after growing public fears over jellyfish ‘blooms’ in the Mediterranean. Monitoring has since begun in Spain.

The man behind the plan, Professor of zoology Ferdinando Boero, warned: ‘Jellyfish cause problems for swimmers, particularly as some species are a real health hazard. ‘An Italian woman was killed last year after being stung by a Portuguese Man o’ War.

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Portuguese Man of War first aid kit available mid October..medically supported safe and effective..

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Swarms of jellyfish invading the Med, warns top scientist

By Daily Mail Reporter

Enormous swarms of jellyfish – some of them deadly – are taking over the Mediterranean, a top scientist has warned.

The holiday hotspot, a favorite with Brits, has seen a sharp increase in numbers and could turn into an ‘ocean of jellyfish’.  

The scheme started in Italy and Israel three years ago after growing public fears over jellyfish ‘blooms’. Monitoring has since begun in Spain.

The man behind the plan, Professor of zoology Ferdinando Boero, warned: ‘Jellyfish cause problems for swimmers, particularly as some species are a real health hazard.

‘An Italian woman was killed last year after being stung by a Portuguese Man o’ War.

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Jellyfish sting relief lotion and Portuguese Man of War first aid kit available mid October…look for it at your favorite retailer

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Rock-Chewing Sea Urchins Have Self-Sharpening Teeth

Rock-Chewing Sea Urchins Have Self-Sharpening Teeth.

Try the new Sea Urchin first aid kit in our distinctive gold bag…Ask for it by name..Don’t get stung without it !!

 

Southern Stingray..warm water Atlantic species

The Southern Stingray is an inshore species, frequenting shallow, open areas of sand and mud bottom. It is commonly encountered in bays and estuaries, usually buried in sand with only its eyes and spiracles exposed. In addition to sand bottoms, the Southern Stingray has been observed in sea grass beds, turbid estuaries, clear lagoons, and resting on reef faces.


Known depth range is from the intertidal zone down to at least 82 feet. Although primarily a tropical to warm temperate Atlantic species, the Southern Stingray is sometimes found as far north as New Jersey, having evidently migrated to higher latitudes as the water warms in summer.

The sting consists of a blade-like barb with serrations along both edges and a venom gland at the base. The serrae point toward the base of the spine, making removal difficult and very painful. The venom is a fairly powerful nerve toxin which affects the heart in complex and dangerous ways.

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Stingray City..Cayman Islands

There are at least 96 species of stingrays worldwide (families Dasyatididae and Urolophidae combined), of which 5 are common in the Caribbean. The species predominant in the Cayman Island’s ‘Stingray City’ is the Southern Stingray (Dasyatis americana).

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Australian smooth stingray..

The largest of the world’s stingrays is the Smooth Stingray (Dasyatis brevicaudata). It can weigh well over 700 lbs., measure over 6 ft. 2 m across the wings and have an overall length of 14 ft.  It is common throughout its range, from southern Queensland around the south coast to Shark Bay in Western Australia.

The Smooth Stingray is dark grey to black above with a distinctive pattern of small white spots scattered across the base of the fins below and behind the eye. The tail is thick with a single row of blunt thorns ending with one or two barbed spines midway along the tail which then quickly tapers to a point.

The Smooth Stingray is curious and will approach swimmers and divers, especially if there is bait or berley in the water. While these animals are easily trained to take hand-held bait, they are potentially dangerous if they retain their large barbed spines.

When threatened, cornered or molested they will curl their tail up and over their back in a threat display.

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Nyad says she underestimated man o' war threat..

The Associated Press  JENNIFER KAY (Associated Press)

In this photo released by the Florida Keys News Bureau, endurance swimmer Diana Nyad shows Portuguese Man o’ War jellyfish stings after she arrived in Key West, Fla., Sunday, Sept. 25, 2011, following a third unsuccessful attempt to swim from Havana to the Florida Keys.

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(AP Photo/Florida Keys News Bureau, Mike Marrero)

Fire Coral painful but rarely life threatening unless…

Although it can be quite painful, a sting from Fire coral is rarely dangerous unless accompanied by an allergic reaction or anaphylactic shock. In fact, the most serious effects seen after extensive stings are possible nausea and vomiting for two to three hours afterwards.

The sting caused by these animals is a result of the injection of a water-soluble, heat affected, proteinaceous toxin. The discharged nematocysts cause small welts on the skin with red lesions around the raised areas. Swelling, blisters, and pus-filled encystations may occur soon after being stung.

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Square Fire Coral..one of three species found in the Caribbean

One of the three Caribbean species, this is the most easily identified Milleporaspecies, M. squarrosa. It is named for the squarish indentions on its surface. Its color is nearly always pinkish, and it tends to be found in areas where it very much resembles coralline algae. Upon touching, however, it is very apparent that it is not coralline algae.

 

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Photo courtesy of Eric Borneman.

Skin contact with Fire Coral symptoms…

Symptoms begin within 5-30 minutes following skin contact with fire coral, an immediate burning sensation or a stinging pain develops. A red rash with raised lesions or vesicles appears, and itching develops. Lymph gland swelling may occur over time. Although rare, nausea and vomiting have been reported.
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