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Deadly Irukandji jellyfish visits Western Australian waters….


Local fisherman Beau Cartledge was one of the people that spotted the 'blanket' of jellyfish
Local fisherman Beau Cartledge was one of the people that spotted the ‘blanket’ of jellyfish

Irukandji Jellyfish have been reported in Pilbara coastal waters and people considering ocean-based activities including swimming, snorkeling, fishing and even launching boats should take care.

Local fisherman Beau Cartledge reported seeing the jellyfish on January 20 to the Department of Fisheries.

“On Friday morning, just after seven, a mate of mine and I were at the Back Beach boat ramp when my mate first saw all these little jellyfish,” he said.

“I’ve never seen anything like it before, it looked like a blanket of jellyfish that kept on going.

“I’ve lived up here for so long, so I knew what kind of jellyfish they were and how dangerous they can be.

“We decided to ring the fisheries immediately and post a status on Facebook to make as many people aware as possible.”

Mr Cartledge said that because of the school holidays he was aware that a higher number of people would be visiting the area and would hate for anyone to be stung.

“To an untrained eye, people may not be aware just how dangerous the Irukandji Jellyfish can be,” he said.

“A kid may have jumped straight in and that could be it.

Shire of Roebourne Chief Executive Officer Collene Longmore said the Irukandji Jellyfish was very small, not much bigger than a match head, but its sting could be extremely unpleasant and painful, even deadly.

“They are related to the larger box jellyfish, which are also found in the coastal waters of the North West,” Ms Longmore said.

“Irukandji stings may be barely noticeable at first, however symptoms gradually become apparent and then more and more intense in the following five to 120 minutes (30 minutes on average).”

Irukandji syndrome includes an array of systemic symptoms including severe headache, backache, muscle pains, chest and abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, sweating, anxiety, hypertension, tachycardia and pulmonary edema.

Irukandji are present in the North West all year round, although they are more predominant from November through to April.

While our team has never tested our product on the Irukandji, the Australian Resuscitation Council recommends the same 5% acetic acid, as found in our Jellyfish Sting Relief Solution formula, be applied to relieve pain as the injured is off to the hospital IMMEDIATELY!!  So, we can’t say first hand like we can, with absolute certainty, how effective our products are on a very wide range of other jellyfish specie stings just as we can when describing our full line of marine sting products including Man o’ War, Fire Coral, Sea Urchin and Stingray first aid kits.  Tested, medically supported and effective.

Post courtesy of  ..Pilbaraecho.com.au  Karratha News

Ocean Care Solutions easy to use Jellyfish Sting Relief product

Our full line of marine sting products have been tested and proven effective..Lidocaine free, medically recommended 5% acetic acid and easy to use..Don’t get stung without it!!  Here’s how to use our product…no mixing, or filling bottles or unnecessary steps…spray it on and scrape away the pain…..it’s that easy and effective!!

1) The untreated sting should not be rubbed or rinsed in fresh water…RINSE IN SALT WATER ONLY !!  Remove visible tentacles with a stick, gloved hand or tweezers…Never touch the tentacle with a bare hand!!!!

2) Apply Ocean Care solutions Jellyfish Sting Relief solution generously to cover the sting area without rubbing

3)  After 3-5 minutes, gently scrape using a flat, dull edge such as a credit card or driver’s license (anything flat with an edge) to remove the lotion.  THIS IMPORTANT STEP REMOVES REMAINING STINGING CELLS LEFT ON THE SKIN !!!!

4)  Reapplication of OCS Jellyfish Sting Relief is recommended for any stinging cells that remain on the skin after the 1st. application..use twice for the Portugese Man of War and use heat to 113 degrees (heat to skin tolerance without burning the skin)  OCS Man o War First Aid kit is specially designed to have everything you need for the Man o War envenomation.

5) If minor irritation or itching persists, treat with a hydrocortisone cream

6)  Always seek medical attention should symptoms persist or worsen

Is the Box jellyfish is watching you..??

The box jellyfish is able to see through four sets of eyes, one at the center of each side of the bell, each set clustered in a club-shaped structure called the rhopalium. Each set actually consists of six eyes: four simple pigmented pits with photoreceptors and two complex camera eyes, one pointing up and one pointing down, each with a cornea, lens, and retina. Scientists are not sure how the animal processes the visual information since it has no brain. Certainly, God designed this “primitive” animal with amazing capabilities that defy any evolutionary explanation.

Features

  • Box jellyfish are pale blue, transparent, and bell or cube shaped with four distinct sides.
  • The box jellyfish has a group of 15 tentacles at each corner of its body, with up to 5,000 stinging cells each.

Fun Facts

  • Box jellies are also called sea wasps and marine stingers.
  • The box jellyfish is not a true jellyfish
  • The box jellyfish is one of the most venomous creatures in the ocean. Its sting can kill a human in just a few minutes, its venom attacking the nervous system.
  • Some sea turtles can eat the box jellyfish without being affected by its sting.

CLASS: Cubozoa (sea wasps or box jellyfish)
ORDER: Cubomedusae
FAMILY: Chirodropidae
GENUS/SPECIES: Chironex fleckeri

Size: Up to 10 in (25 cm); tentacles up to 10 ft (3 m)
Depth: Near the surface
Diet: Shrimp and small fish
Habitat: Open tropical waters of southwest Pacific and eastern Indian Oceans

Ocean Care Solutions Jellyfish Sting relief solution is proven effective on the Box jellyfish envenomation..Don’t get stung without it !!

Article and information courtesy of Answers in Genesis.org

The Thimble jellyfish and swimmer's itch….

The thimble jellyfish is the half-inch long and is found in the north Atlantic, Arctic and northern Pacific coastal waters during spring and early summer. It has four tentacles, that are covered with the usual nematocysts that discharge the toxins. This jellyfish is known to feed on crustacean plankton and barnacle larvae. It swims intermittently and then holds still with its tentacles extended. A passing prey is captured when it comes in contact with its tentacles. The toxins in the tentacles will immobilize the small prey and they will bend inwards to take the prey to the mouth where it is ingested and digested.

The thimble jellyfish is the half-inch long and is found in the north Atlantic, Arctic and northern Pacific coastal waters during spring and early summer. It has four tentacles, that are covered with the usual nematocysts that discharge the toxins. This jellyfish is known to feed on crustacean plankton and barnacle larvae. It swims intermittently and then holds still with its tentacles extended. A passing prey is captured when it comes in contact with its tentacles. The toxins in the tentacles will immobilize the small prey and they will bend inwards to take the prey to the mouth where it is ingested and digested.

Thimbles are usually found in blooms..

The sting of the thimble jellyfish is not deadly but will usually cause a burning and itching. The thimble jelly is also hard to detect, but actually it is the larvae of this jellyfish that causes the main problem to bathers in the Caribbean. These larvae are often refereed to as sea lice, and cause a lot of painful rash, called the “seabather’s eruption” on the victim. They are very tiny and you wont know that you have been affected until the rash appears. These tiny jellyfish usually will get caught in between the swim suit and the skin of the person. The parts that get rubbed will get the most infestations, like the inner thighs, armpits, neck and so on.  Ocean Care Solutions provides very effective relief on the rash discomfort.

The sting of the thimble jellyfish is not deadly but will usually cause a burning and itching. The thimble jelly is also hard to detect, but actually it is the larvae of this jellyfish that causes the main problem to bathers in the Caribbean. These larvae are often refereed to as sea lice, and cause a lot of painful rash, called the “seabather’s eruption” on the victim. They are very tiny and you wont know that you have been affected until the rash appears. These tiny jellyfish usually will get caught in between the swim suit and the skin of the person. The parts that get rubbed will get the most infestations, like the inner thighs, armpits, neck and so on.  Ocean Care Solutions Jellyfish Sting Relief provides very effective relief on the rash discomfort.

www.oceancaresolutions.com

Jellyfish Sting Relief Solution is safe and effect sting pain relief..

 

Chesapeake Bay Lion's Mane..Part 3

Found throughout brackish and salty waters, including shallow waters, open waters and tidal rivers

Lion’s mane jellyfish are common in the Bay in late November-March.  Although capable of attaining a bell diameter of 2.5 metres (8.2 ft), these jellyfish can vary greatly in size, those found in lower latitudes are much smaller than their far northern counterparts with bells about 50 centimetres (20 in) in diameter. The tentacles of larger specimens may trail as long as 30 metres (98 ft) or more. These extremely sticky tentacles are grouped into eight clusters, each cluster containing over 100 tentacles, arranged in a series of rows.

Ocean Care Solutions Jellyfish Sting Relief is safe and effective on the nettle envenomation..Don’t get stung without it  !!

Sources and Additional Information:

Chesapeake Bay jellyfish..Part 2

Another species more commonly found in the bay is the Moon jelly or common jellyfish, Aurelia aurita and usually visit the lower Chesapeake Bay in summer.

The moon jellyfish is the Bay’s largest jellyfish. It can grow 10-12 inches in diameter. Hundreds of short tentacles hang like fringe from the bell’s edge.

It can be recognized by its four horseshoe-shaped gonads that are easily seen through the top of the bell. It feeds by collecting medusae, plankton and mollusks with its mucusy bell nematocyst-laden tentacles and bringing the prey into its body for digestion, but is capable of only limited motion; like other jellies it primarily drifts with the current, even when it is swimming.

 

Ocean Care Solutions Jellyfish Sting Relief is safe and effective on the nettle envenomation..Don’t get stung without it  !!

Sources and Additional Information:

 

Jellyfish commonly found in Chesapeake Bay..Part 1

Sea nettles are a type of jellyfish common in the Chesapeake Bay.

Sea nettles are a type of jellyfish common in the Chesapeake Bay. (Wally Gobetz/Flickr)

Jellyfish are floating animals with gelatinous, umbrella-shaped bells and stinging tentacles.

Three species of jellyfish can be found in the Chesapeake Bay:

  • Sea nettle, Chrysaora quinquecirrha
  • Sea nettles are abundant in May-October as far north as the Chesapeake Bay Bridge
    • Sea nettles and lion’s mane jellyfish prey upon fish, shrimp, comb jellies and other small creatures
    • Use their stinging tentacles to entangle, paralyze and capture their prey. Each stinging cell is like a barb that injects venom into its prey. Jellyfish then use their tentacles to move the food into their mouth, which is located under the center of the bell.

Appearance:

  • Transparent, gelatinous body
  • Umbrella-shaped bell called a medusa
  • Tentacles with stinging cells hang from the bell. The stinging cells are called nematocysts.
  • Sea nettles have a smooth, milky white bell that grows to about 4 inches in diameter. Up to 24 tentacles hang from under the bell.
  • Many larger species, including fish, crustaceans and sea turtles, eat sea nettles
  • Sea nettles spawn in mid-summer. They die after spawning.
  • Sea nettles are nearly 90 percent water
  • Capable of inflicting a serious sting
Ocean Care Solutions Jellyfish Sting Relief is safe and effective on the nettle envenomation..Don’t get stung without it  !!

Sources and Additional Information:

 

Beware of jellyfish larvae as bathers head for the beach..New Zealand

They’re back.

Bathers at Hibiscus Coast beaches are reporting rashes thought to be caused by jellyfish larvae.  Pharmacies have seen an increase in people seeking treatment for the problem.  The rash is caused by jellyfish and some sea anemone larvae stings during warm conditions.

“We had none the whole year, until a couple of weeks ago. We’ve two or three people coming in every day,” Manly Care Chemist pharmacist Marian Kelly says.

Whangaparaoa Radius Pharmacy had on average five customers daily during the past fortnight. “It’s a lot of people coming in. I saw about four or five customers last Thursday on my own,” dispensary manager and pharmacist Tania Iskenderian says. “A customer was stung at Stanmore Bay Beach, and another at Manly.”

Ms Kelly says they have been getting cases from Manly, and Tiritiri Matangi where people have gone diving.  “We’re located in Manly, so we’re getting people who have just come in from the beach,” she says.

Bathers feel a tingling sensation when in the water. Rashes typically develop underneath the bathing costume, where the jellyfish larvae are trapped. Itching can last for several weeks, and some people may feel unwell.

Rubbing with a towel makes it worse.

“As soon as bathers leave the sea they must get out of their swimsuit and have a shower,” Ms Kelly says. “Don’t shower with swimsuits on as freshwater irritates the jellyfish pods, causing them to sting.

“The bathing suits must be machine washed and tumbled dry.

“Some people handwash it, and hang it on the line, but the larvae can still sting. It’s your skin squishing against it, activating the larvae toxin.”

Beachgoers should give their bathing suits a thorough wash and hang them in the sun if a dryer is not available.

“Have at least two togs handy, so you’ve one spare to change into,” Ms Kelly says.  Treatments include antihistamine and lotions.

Sea bather’s eruption, reported in the Rodney Times last year during early February, is sometimes blamed on sea lice.

Ocean Care Solutions Jellyfish Sting Relief solution is proven effective for sea lice…Spray it on and scrape away the pain..Don’t get stung without it  !!

Article written by MICHELE ONG courtesy of Rodney Times/Auckland Now/Fairfax NZ News

Jellyfish invade Auckland beaches

Beachgoers have been left with painful rashes as tiny jellyfish fill the warming waters of the Hauraki Gulf.

Aucklanders and holidaymakers looking to take advantage of this week’s sunny weather are being warned to take care at all Hauraki Gulf beaches after an outbreak of swimmer’s rash in the past week.  Swimmers have suffered the rash, medically known as sea bather’s eruption and often falsely attributed to sea lice, at Kohimarama, Long Bay, Milford, Takapuna and Maraetai beaches.  The rash can be itchier than a severe case of chickenpox and last up to two weeks.

Simon Baker, medical officer of health at the Auckland Regional Public Health Service, said the jellyfish were too small to be seen but caused painful rashes on skin that was covered by swimsuits.  “[Victims] can be really unwell and kept awake at night with nasty itches. It can be a real nuisance.”

Juley Van Der Reyden’s 6-year-old son, Kellan, went swimming at Maraetai Beach on Saturday and developed a rash that was more irritable than when he had chickenpox.  “I actually cut all his fingernails so he wouldn’t break the skin,” Ms Van Der Reyden said. “He had on a two-piece – long rash vest and shorts – so he’s got it all over his back and tummy and around his legs.”  Her 3-year-old daughter, Romilly, also developed a rash around her legs.

Ms Van Der Reyden would like warning signs put up at affected beaches, but Dr Baker said the problem was likely to affect all gulf swimming spots, so this was not practical.  Luane Botha of Pohutukawa Pharmacy in Beachlands said that in the past week, about 15 customers had sought treatment for their children.  “We had a few that were really, really bad … They had it right over their body. You can’t really do much … just something for the itch like an antihistamine.”  Dr Baker said health authorities were contacting pharmacies and doctors to find out how widespread the problem was.

The microscopic jellyfish get trapped in the fabric of swimwear and tend to sting once swimmers have left the water.  Towelling-down can cause the jellyfish to sting, because they release stinging cells when put under pressure.  Children often suffer the worst reaction to the stings because of their soft skin, with hundreds to thousands of tiny red bumps forming in clusters.  A similar outbreak of sea bather’s eruption occurred last February as La Nina’s warm currents encouraged the spread of the jellyfish on eastern Auckland beaches.  The larvae are usually found in warm, still water and are rarely a problem at beaches with heavy surf, such as Piha.

Hydromedusa from the Pacific are tiny  jellyfish are invisible in the ocean. Photo / Supplied

Dr Baker said the only sure-fire way to avoid the rash was to not swim at affected beaches. But swimmers could lessen their risk by not wearing large, baggy clothing and by removing their togs on leaving the water.

Last month, thousands of jellyfish washed up on Wellington’s south coast beaches, including the dangerous bluebottle or Pacific man o’ war, sparking warnings from authorities.

And a swarm of bluebottles, including one with 2.5-metre-long tentacles, closed Oreti Beach, near Invercargill, this month.

Ocean Care Solutions 5% acetic acid jellyfish sting relief is very effective on “swimmer’s itch” as well as a wide variety of jellyfish sting envenomations.  don’t go to the beach with it  !!

Article written by Nicholas Jones..NZHerald.co.nz

Incredible Photographs of Jellyfish by Alexander Semenov

Jellyfish photos Alexander Semenov

In 2007, Russian underwater photographer Alexander Semenovgraduated from Lomonosov’s Moscow State University in the department of Zoology. He specialized in the study of invertebrate animals, with an emphasis on squid brains. Soon after, he began working at the White Sea Biological Station (WSBS) as a senior laborer. After four years of working at the WSBS dive station, he became chief of the diving team. He now organizes all WSBS projects, and dives by himself, always with a camera.

Jellyfish photos Alexander Semenov

Jellyfish photos Alexander Semenov

Jellyfish photos Alexander Semenov

Jellyfish photos Alexander Semenov

Jellyfish photos Alexander Semenov

Jellyfish photos Alexander Semenov

Jellyfish photos Alexander Semenov