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Highly venomous jellyfish coming to a beach near you…Northeast U.S. sees Man o War

Significant blooms of venomous warm-water species of Mauve jellyfish and the Portuguese Man o War have arrived in numbers along the Atlantic east coast and north east coastal waters to the Hampton’s and beyond respectively.  both deliver potent and very painful stings.Many’s the argument as to the cause for the explosion of jellies worldwide with claims centered on global warming of sea waters is causing the biggest movement of marine species, according to a study by 17 different institutes, called Project Clamer. The Pelagia noctiluca “dominates in many areas and outbreaks have become an annual event, forcing the closing of beaches,” says the report.  “This form of jellyfish is a gluttonous predator of juvenile fish, so researchers consider its spread a harmful trend.”However, there was further bad news as the report also warned that the highly-venomous Portuguese Man O’War is also moving closer and in abundance.

Physalia physalis; a jellyfish-like creature (really a 4 organism siphonophore) usually found in subtropical waters, is more regularly being discovered in northern Atlantic waters as recently as the holiday weekend in Martha’s Vineyard of the Massachusetts coast.  Likely driven by warm current and winds not seen since 2006, the Man o War is not typically found this far north.  It is not uncharacteristic to see the Lion’s Mane, another nasty stinger, in the cooler waters typical to the northern shores now in addition to these animals.

ManOWar-kit

It might be time to buy yourself a new pair of jelly shoes for the beach or take along OCS Jellyfish Sting Relief spray and/or  our MOW 1st Kit…We hope you don’t need it but if you do, you will be glad you have it..The Solution for marine sting injuries…Don’t get stung without it!!

 

Ocean Care Solutions marine sting 1st aid distribution network includes Hong Kong

Ocean Care Solutions welcomes Blue Yonder Diving Gear Distribution and Retail as a distributor in Hong Kong…They have the latest dive gear and accessories..Call or e mail Stephanie at Phone +852 3106 8383 Email Info@mydivegear.com or find them on FaceBook at https://www.facebook.com/pages/Blue-Yonder/599178576777067

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=469107463163920&set=a.412876138787053.98398.156715257736477&type=1&theater

Red Sea Fire Urchin…

Asthenosoma marisrubri (‘flexible body of the Red Sea’) aka Red Sea Fire Urchin and Toxic Leather Sea Urchin , is a relatively common sea urchin with a widespread distribution in the Indo-Pacific, and it subsists on a great variety of food including algae, coral polyps and bottom detritus. It is most active at night and is named for the extreme pain inflicted by its spines and its occurrence in the Red Sea.

SeaUrchin-kit

www.oceancaresolutions

Sea Urchin first aid kit

Don’t get stung without it!

 

Australian Bull Ray….Stingray

The Australian bull ray has a disc that is wider than it is long. The snout is blunt with a skirt-shaped inter nasal flap as well as a single fleshy lobe that surrounds the snout and almost reaches the pectoral fins. The medium-sized eyes are located on the sides of the head and the spiracles are large. The pectoral fins which make up the “wings” of this ray originate below the eyes. The margins of the pectoral fins are deeply concave and the tips are highly angular. There is a small dorsal fin that originates over or just behind the pelvic fin rear tips and is anterior to the spine on the tail. The tail is elongate and whip-like and has a venomous stinging spine located just behind the dorsal fin.
Stingray first aid kits available through DFA, on line or at your favorite retail beach/dive shop…don’t get stung without it!!

Ocean Care Solutions new Lionfish Sting 1st Aid Kit expands company family of marine sting first aid products

Ocean Care Solutions is devoted to providing safe and effective marine sting first aid products for the consumer.  Our products have been tested true as each individual kit follows the medically accepted first aid protocol supported by life saving agencies, physicians and medical facility research groups worldwide.  Each kit has all the components necessary, with easy to follow instructions, to provide immediate 1st aid medical attention on a variety of marine stingers.  No matter what you pleasure at the ocean; sport fishing, surfing, scuba, distance swimming, snorkeling or just hangin’ out in the surf, always be prepared with Ocean Care Solutions first aid products….Available on line or select retailers…Ask for it by name..You’ll be glad your did !!

ocs fmly5 IMG_0032

 

Field use report from Galveston Island Beach Patrol/Park Board Police Dept

Over this past summer season, Ocean Care Solutions, Inc. provided Chief Peter Davis and supervising staff from the Galveston Island Beach Patrol/Park Board Police Dept. (www.galvestonbeachpatrol.com) with our Stingray and Man o War Sting First Aid Kits.

Here is the e mail OCS received from Chief Davis…

We did get to use the product quite a bit, although we used saline to wash the area as opposed to vinegar, thus following the recommendations of the USLA and medical protocols set by our medical director. People really seemed to respond well to it. They liked the packaging and the way it is a self contained treatment that they could potentially carry with them “just in case”.

Hope things are good with you. We had a fairly easy season as far as stings go, but enough for all of our supervisors to be able to use the product.

Take care,
Peter

Chief Peter Davis
Galveston Island Beach Patrol/Park Board Police Dept

Jellyfish on the rise: UBC study

Jellyfish are increasing in the majority of the world’s coastal ecosystems, according to the first global study of jellyfish abundance by University of British Columbia researchers.

In a study published in this month’s edition of the journal Hydrobiologia, UBC scientists examined data for numerous species of jellyfish for 45 of the world’s 66 Large Marine Ecosystems. They found increasing jellyfish populations in 62 per cent of the regions analyzed, including East Asia, the Black Sea, the Mediterranean, the Northeast U.S. Shelf, Hawaii, and Antarctica.

“There has been anecdotal evidence that jellyfish were on the rise in recent decades, but there hasn’t been a global study that gathered together all the existing data until now,” says Lucas Brotz, a PhD student with the Sea Around Us Project at UBC and lead author of the study.

“Our study confirms these observations scientifically after analysis of available information from 1950 to the present for more than 138 different jellyfish populations around the world.”

Jellyfish directly interfere with many human activities – by stinging swimmers, clogging intakes of power plants, and interfering with fishing. Some species of jellyfish are now a food source in some parts of the world.

“By combining published scientific data with other unpublished data and observations, we could make this study truly global – and offer the best available scientific estimate of a phenomenon that has been widely discussed,” says Daniel Pauly, principal investigator of the Sea Around Us Project and co-author of the study. “We can also see that the places where we see rising numbers of jellyfish are often areas heavily impacted by humans, through pollution, overfishing, and warming waters.”

Map of population trends of native and invasive species of jellyfish by LME. Red: increase (high certainty); orange: increase (low certainty); green stable/variable; blue decrease, grey: no data. Circles represent jellyfish populations with relative sizes reflecting confidence in the data.

Pauly adds that increasing anecdotal reports of jellyfish abundance may have resulted from an expansion of human activities in marine habitats, so the study also provides a concrete baseline for future studies.

The study also notes decreases in jellyfish abundance in seven per cent of coastal regions, while the remainder of the marine ecosystems showed no obvious trend.

Article and data courtesy of Lucas Brotz, PhD student with the Sea Around Us Project at UBC and lead author of the study.

 

Glaucus Atlanticus Sea Slug: Feeds on the Man o War

Glaucus Atlanticus Sea Slug: Animal Of The Week

The Glaucus Atlanticus Sea Slug is as unusual as its appearance suggests – this thing is honestly pretty weird, but we can forgive it since it is so breath-taking.  These creatures are three centimeters long and predominantly colored with silver and blue tints.  They are found in tropical waters, specifically those off of the coast of Africa and Australia.  Though they exist predominantly in these locations, they can also be found off of European coasts.

The Glaucus Atlanticus Sea Slug floats on top of the water by using it’s gas filled sac.  Surprisingly, these tiny slugs actually feed on large, dangerous, poisonous animals; namely the Portuguese Man O’ War.  Yeah, those are the things that you try to avoid at all costs whenever you go snorkeling in the ocean, because their stings hurt like no other.  According to marine biologists, the sea slug can and usually does consume the entire Man o War organism and absorbs the toxins from the creature it just preyed upon, and then saves that poison as a self-defense mechanism.  Pretty amazing given the size of the Sea Slug.

 

Blue Fire Jellyfish…

The Blue Jellyfish is also known as Bluefire Jellyfish, scientific name Cyanea lamarckii. It is a jellyfish species of the Cyneidae family and is likely to be known as Cyanea capillata nozakii or Cyanea nozakii among populations in Western Pacific of Japan. Blue Jellyfish also sting and have their own unique effects. It’s important to realize that almost all jellyfish sting but the degree of the sting is contingent on the species in question and how your body reacts to a sting. As such, the typical effects and symptoms of a jellyfish sting can range from a simple rash to an angry blister that requires urgent medical attention.


Blue Jellyfish sting effects include intense hurtful pain, wheals, and rash while its progressive effects include vomiting, nausea, diarrhea, fever, sweating, chills, swelling of the lymph nodes, back and abdominal pain, among others. In case you are the type of person who reacts severely on stings, the blue jellyfish sting effects might make it difficult for you to breath. It can also lead into a coma and to some very extreme cases death if the venom spreads widely into your blood.


In case a blue jelly fish stings you, you don’t have to wait for the effects to show before treating it. First off, you should rinse the affected areas using sea water. You should by all means avoid fresh water as it will only exacerbate the pain. Don’t rub the affected area, neither should you apply ice on it, instead, let it to cool off on its own. Blue jellyfish sting effects might also leave you with tentacles on, which should be removed sparingly using tweezers. Never rub them off using your bare hands. Your aim should be to put out of action the extremity since any slight movement can make the poison spread.

Ocean Care Solutions’ Jellyfish Sting Relief can effect pain relief if stung by this animal but severe blue jellyfish sting effects would require you to seek further medical attention.

 

Photos courtesy of Sue Daly Productions

Can Sea Urchins see you???

Researchers have known for a long time that sea urchins respond to abrupt changes in light. But they’ve been unsure about how they do it, because there are no structures that even remotely resemble eyes.

In 2009, though, researchers discovered that urchins have the same genes as those found in the retinas of humans and other creatures. The retina is the part of the eye that perceives light.

And two years later, they found bundles of light-sensitive structures on the bases and tips of their tube feet. Since a sea urchin has more than a thousand of these feet, it means they could have a couple of thousand “eyes.” The urchin’s vision isn’t very sharp, though — it reacts to big objects, but not to small ones. So it’s unclear whether it forms actual images of what’s around it, or just perceives changes in light.

Of course, the sea urchin does use its feet to clamber around the bottom of the ocean. But it doesn’t use all of them at the same time. So it’s possible that it uses some to get around, and some to keep an eye out for food, shelter, and predators.

Those bristly spines may also play a role in the sea urchin’s vision. They may shade some of the “eyes” from bright light — helping turn the entire creature into one big, prickly eyeball.

If you step on one of these animals, be sure to have along OCS Sea Urchin First Aid Kit..this isn’t hot wax and a burning candle; our kit is effecitive, medically proven first aid…

 

Article courtesy of  http://www.scienceandthesea.org