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Lionfish Distribution as of 2012 as reported by the United States Geologic Survey (USGS) with a great deal of data provided by NOAA and REEF.

Ocean Care Solutions new Lionfish Sting 1st Aid Kit expands company family of marine sting first aid products

Ocean Care Solutions is devoted to providing safe and effective marine sting first aid products for the consumer.  Our products have been tested true as each individual kit follows the medically accepted first aid protocol supported by life saving agencies, physicians and medical facility research groups worldwide.  Each kit has all the components necessary, with easy to follow instructions, to provide immediate 1st aid medical attention on a variety of marine stingers.  No matter what you pleasure at the ocean; sport fishing, surfing, scuba, distance swimming, snorkeling or just hangin’ out in the surf, always be prepared with Ocean Care Solutions first aid products….Available on line or select retailers…Ask for it by name..You’ll be glad your did !!

ocs fmly5 IMG_0032

 

Beachhunter.net David McRee product review of Ocean Care Solutions new Lionfish Sting 1st aid kit.

Reducing Lionfish Polulations..

Faced with a dramatic reduction of native populations of fish–which support fishing and diving recreational tourism–nearly everyone is working to reduce the lionfish populations. From spearfishing to hook and lining, any method to get them out of the water is seen as a step in the right direction. Citizen organizations like LionFishHunters and The Lionfish PSA have sprung up to educate the public and direct us toward steps necessary to control this opportunistic species.

Especially in the Florida Keys, locals are trying hard to put lionfish on the menu in seafood restaurants, hoping we can eat them into submission. Lionfish is reported to have an excellent taste and is often compared to hogfish or snapper. It’s not dangerous to eat because the poison is only contained in the spines. The meat is safe to eat.

Want to know how to clean and cook a lionfish? Here’s a great 4 minute video to show you how:

For a very well produced video by CNN on the lionfish problem, check out the 7 minute video below:

Below are some additional links to information about the Florida lionfish “invasion.”

Reef.org – Report a lionfish sighting and learn more about the whole lionfish thing, including links to some restaurants that have lionfish on the menu.

Mote Tropical Research Lab lionfish info. An excellent web site with a lot of information and links to other resources.

Content courtesy of David McRee..Beachhunter.net

http://www.blogthebeach.com/2012/nature/fish/lionfish-in-florida-problems-and-solutions

Related posts:

  1. Indo-Pacific Lionfish Threaten Florida
  2. Product Review: First Aid Kit for Marine Animal Stings: Jellyfish, Stingrays, Urchins, Fire Coral
  3. Dolphin Stranding with Happy Ending

Lionfish envenomation 1st aid kit developed by Ocean Care Solutions

Lionfish are colorful marine fish with venomous spiky fin rays. Its presence is increasing around the seas of the world and present a danger to fishermen, divers and swimmers. Its venom can lead to extreme pain, nausea, vomiting, fever, breathing difficulties, convulsions, dizziness, redness on the affected area, headaches, and numbness although its venom is rarely fatal.

This chilling animated graphic shows the population explosion of poisonous lionfish in Florida, the Caribbean, the Bahamas and the Atlantic seaboard between 1986 and 2011: http://nas.er.usgs.gov/taxgroup/fish/Lionfishanimation.gif 

Treating Lionfish Sting Injuries

Being stung by the long, thin, needle-sharp spines of even a small lionfish generally results in a fire-like pain which is often localized to the area stung, but may travel along the extremity. Expect swelling. Needless to say, a sting to the head, neck or body cavity is more serious and should be considered a medical emergency. It is possible that a portion of the spine may break off in the wound, requiring surgical intervention. Infection is always a possibility. A host of other symptoms and complications are possible.

First-aid for a lionfish sting (before you can get to a doctor) mainly consists of applying heat, which destroys the venom. The problem is, where are you going to get heat if you are out on a boat or standing on a dock?

Ocean Care Solutions has developed a lionfish sting first-aid kit that has what you need. It should be available around mid-January 2013 and will retail for around $20. The supplies contained in the kit are based on treatment protocols with scientific and medical support and derive from medical data and injury reports.
Ocean Care Solutions Lionfish Sting First-Aid Kit

What’s in the OCS Lionfish Sting First-Aid Kit?

  • Moist towelette for cleaning hands
  • Latex-free gloves
  • Gauze pad to help slow bleeding
  • Sterile saline solution for rinsing wound
  • Forceps / tweezers to remove spines
  • Instant Heat Pack to alleviate pain
  • Elastic wrap for holding heat pack in place
  • Ocean Care Solutions triple antibiotic ointment
  • Adhesive bandages

Ocean Care Solutions is a pioneer in the development of effective, convenient and affordable first-aid kits for marine sting injuries, including for jellyfish, stingrays, sea urchins, fire-coral, and Portuguese Man-of-War.

Ocean Care Solutions’ products were nominated for the 2012 World Open Water Swimming Offering of the Year.

Below are the instructions as shown on the back of the foil packet which houses the kit. Click on the image below to enlarge it enough to read:

Click image to enlarge

Content courtesy of David McRee..Beachhunter.net

http://www.blogthebeach.com/2012/nature/fish/lionfish-in-florida-problems-and-solutions

Ocean Care Solutions Does Its Lion Share Of Work

 

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 18, 2012

Posted by Steve Munatones

Ocean Care Solutions Does Its Lion Share Of Work

Ron Adley announced a new Ocean Care Solutions for Lionfish Kit. “The kit will be available by January 15th. It is another product in our increasing line of marine sting products including a newly formulated jellyfish sting relief spray.”Lionfish are colorful marine fish with venomous spiky fin rays. Its presence is increasing around the seas of the world and present a danger to fishermen, divers and swimmers. Its venom can lead to extreme pain, nausea, vomiting, fever, breathing difficulties, convulsions, dizziness, redness on the affected area, headaches, and numbness although its venom is rarely fatal.

As Adley knows well from his travels, lionfish stings can produce discomfort over several days as well as severe allergic reactions that can cause breathing difficulties, swelling of the tongue, and slurred speech.

Ocean Care Solutions‘ products were nominated for the 2012 World Open Water Swimming Offering of the Year.The nomination of Ocean Care Solutions reads, “Care is its middle name. Ocean Care Solutions is working hard to help stem the tide of the pain and discomfort caused by stinging organisms. Its products enable comforting relief from a number of jellyfish, Portuguese man o war, sea urchins, fire coral and stingrays.

Ocean Care Solutions goes beyond supplying a wide range of first aid kits that are widely acclaimed the world over. It provides information, a constant source of education about the global proliferation of jellyfish in the world’s oceans.

For its desire to relief pain by working directly with the stakeholders in the open water swimming world, for its wide range of soothing solutions, for its sharing of information about the sea stingers that are a growing menace in the aquatic world, the Ocean Care Solutions line-up is a worthy nominee for the 2012 WOWSA Open Water Swimming Offering of the Year.”

Copyright © 2012 by Open Water Source

Field use report from Galveston Island Beach Patrol/Park Board Police Dept

Over this past summer season, Ocean Care Solutions, Inc. provided Chief Peter Davis and supervising staff from the Galveston Island Beach Patrol/Park Board Police Dept. (www.galvestonbeachpatrol.com) with our Stingray and Man o War Sting First Aid Kits.

Here is the e mail OCS received from Chief Davis…

We did get to use the product quite a bit, although we used saline to wash the area as opposed to vinegar, thus following the recommendations of the USLA and medical protocols set by our medical director. People really seemed to respond well to it. They liked the packaging and the way it is a self contained treatment that they could potentially carry with them “just in case”.

Hope things are good with you. We had a fairly easy season as far as stings go, but enough for all of our supervisors to be able to use the product.

Take care,
Peter

Chief Peter Davis
Galveston Island Beach Patrol/Park Board Police Dept

Jellyfish stings..What to do

There are a number of jellyfish species but not all of which are stingers.  Some of the stings are little more than a nuisance and some can be lethal.  Depends on the the animal and, to some degree, the physical condition of the injured as well as the potential for allergic reactions to the neurotoxins from jellyfish stings.  Some of the more common jellyfish found in U.S. waters are the Lion’s Mane, a common stinging jellyfish. It can be found in colors from white to deep blue. It grows to almost 6.5 ft. across. Its tentacles can be up to 18 ft. long and are almost invisible.

Photo of a lion’s-mane jellyfish, a large, pale blue jellyfish with many tentacles.

The Mauve is found in the Mediterranean as well at the Atlantic coastal waters and while, by comparison to the Lion’s Mane, the Pelagia noctiluca has very few tentacles but can deliver a very nasty sting.  Pelagia, in Latin, means “of the sea” and nocti stands for night and luca means light thus Pelagia Noctiluca can be described as a marine organism with the ability to glow in the dark.

Photo of a mauve stinger, a purple jellyfish with several large tentacles hanging from the bell, and a few thinner catch tentacles.

And a siphonophore; the Portuguese Man o War…This is not your every day stinging jellyfish; this is a very nasty, multiple organism, seriously toxic, bad stinging animal that should be treated with respect.  Stay clear of this guy.  The Atlantic Portuguese Man o War found in the Gulf around the Keyes north to Myrtle Beach and beyond on occasion is twice the size of the Blue Bottle found in Australian and Hawaiian waters.  Another distinguishable difference is the Atlantic MOW has multiple tentacles while the Blue bottle has only one strand or arm of stinging tentacles but both of them pack a wallop!

Ocean Care Solutions has specially formulated the recommended medically and scientifically supported jellyfish sting relief spray with 5% acetic acid.  Tested and proven effective, OCS Jellyfish Sting Relief Solution is safe, Lidocaine free and proven effective.

Our medically proven Portuguese Man o War Kit provides on the spot first aid pain relief for this dangerous sting.  Everything the injured needs to provide the first, best step in medical pain relief treatment for a Man o War envenomation.   Even so, always seek medical attention when stung by a Man o War.

Our products are available at select Walgreen’s Drug and other fine retailers. ask for it by name…Don’t get stung without it !!

By the Wind Sailors..Stinging Cnidarians

Image via Wikimedia

Firstly; By-the-wind Sailor, what a wonderfully romantic name!  They get it from their lifestyle which is similar to our very own Portuguese Man o’ War, although they are much smaller and clearly a lot less famous. Sailors reach about 7 centimetres across and have quite a tough, rigid sail to harness the wind. It’s actually made of chitin, like insect exoskeletons. The sail I mean, not the wind. Like the Man o’ War, individuals have sails that bear either left or right into the wind so that when thousands are washed up on a beach, another few thousand have been sent in the opposite direction. When you have one sail and no oars or boat propeller I suppose something like that is necessary. A 50-50 chance is better than none at all! Surrounding the sail are rings of air filled tubes to provide buoyancy.

Image via Wikipedia

Despite the lovely name and care-free (until you hit the rocks) life style, By-the-wind Sailors are Cnidarians, which means they are meat eating, stinging monsters. In this case the tentacles are short, only about 1 cm long, and hang down below the edge of the disc and into the sea. They feed on tiny plankton of various kinds and seem to be completely harmless to humans, clearly a terrible disaster for their chances of fame.

It looks like most people consider By-the-wind Sailors to be made up of hydroid colonies, again, much like the Portuguese Man o’ War. Instead of one, big animal, it’s actually made up of lots of little ones that work together. It looks like others disagree and prefer to see it as something more like a floating, upside down Sea anemone with a sail on its foot. They both sound great to me!

Image Wikipedia

Either way, By-the-wind Sailors are all either male or female. When they mate, they first produce thousands of tiny jellyfish. These are about 3 mm across and are slightly brown because of their friends; inside their bodies are tiny microalgae that can gain energy from the Sun and provide some to their host. They are effectively paying for bed and board, which is nice of them. Eventually, the jellyfish will release sperm or eggs into the water to create new By-the-wind Sailors. Its a pretty odd life cycle, but then Cnidarians are utterly immersed in oddity so we’ll just have to get used to it.

I find it strange that I hadn’t heard of these creatures before. Loads of them get washed up all along the West coast of the US every year and they’ve even done the same in good ol’ Blighty. They look lovely with their rich, blue colours and concentric circles, yet there doesn’t seem to be great deal written about them. Shame. Looks like the Portuguese Man o’ War has stolen all the limelight!

Because the animal is a stinging cnidarian, although OCS has not had the opportunity to test our sting relief solution on this particular animal, all things considered, we are certain our product will provide effective sting relief should you get stung.

 

Article courtesy of Real Monstosities..

Australia's Box Jellyfish: Most Venomous Animal in the World

Documentary featuring Phillippe Cousteau and Jamie Seymour, venom biologist, James Cook University Queensland tracking the Australian Box Jellyfish…Don’t do this at home !!!

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=-2KR8LypESI#t=56s

 

The Marine Sting Institute has recommended the use of 5% acetic acid (vinegar) on the Box jellyfish envenomation.  While the animal is extremely dangerous and life threatening, application of vinegar on the way to the hospital for medical care can provide relief.

Ocean Care Solutions Jellyfish Sting Relief Solution is 5% acetic acid has proven safe, fast acting and effective on the Box jellyfish injury.  Don’t get stung without it !!