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Beachhunter David McRee talks about OCS Jellyfish sting relief spray..Utube

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-PXin2I82kE&feature=youtu.be

Ocean Care Solutions marine sting 1st aid distribution network includes Hong Kong

Ocean Care Solutions welcomes Blue Yonder Diving Gear Distribution and Retail as a distributor in Hong Kong…They have the latest dive gear and accessories..Call or e mail Stephanie at Phone +852 3106 8383 Email Info@mydivegear.com or find them on FaceBook at https://www.facebook.com/pages/Blue-Yonder/599178576777067

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=469107463163920&set=a.412876138787053.98398.156715257736477&type=1&theater

Jellyfish facts…Everything you need to know…

Jellyfish are categorized due to their characteristics. The different species of jellyfish are the Red Type which is also known as the ‘China type’ can be identified as Rhopilema esculentum. These jellyfish are slightly reddish with a 12-24 inch diameter smooth umbrella.

The jellyfish is a popular seafood in eastern and southern Asian nations where there is a high market demand that stimulates large-scale jellyfish production. Due to its economic importance in China, many biological studies have focused on the jellyfish Rhopilema esculentum Kishinouye in terms of the environmental impact of aquaculture activities and culture techniques. In recent years, the commercial aquaculture of R. esculentum has expanded greatly in China

Key Lab of Marine Environmental Science and Ecology, Ministry of Education, Ocean University of China, Qingdao, 266100, China
Photo..M Kawahara

Red Sea Fire Urchin…

Asthenosoma marisrubri (‘flexible body of the Red Sea’) aka Red Sea Fire Urchin and Toxic Leather Sea Urchin , is a relatively common sea urchin with a widespread distribution in the Indo-Pacific, and it subsists on a great variety of food including algae, coral polyps and bottom detritus. It is most active at night and is named for the extreme pain inflicted by its spines and its occurrence in the Red Sea.

SeaUrchin-kit

www.oceancaresolutions

Sea Urchin first aid kit

Don’t get stung without it!

 

Australian Bull Ray….Stingray

The Australian bull ray has a disc that is wider than it is long. The snout is blunt with a skirt-shaped inter nasal flap as well as a single fleshy lobe that surrounds the snout and almost reaches the pectoral fins. The medium-sized eyes are located on the sides of the head and the spiracles are large. The pectoral fins which make up the “wings” of this ray originate below the eyes. The margins of the pectoral fins are deeply concave and the tips are highly angular. There is a small dorsal fin that originates over or just behind the pelvic fin rear tips and is anterior to the spine on the tail. The tail is elongate and whip-like and has a venomous stinging spine located just behind the dorsal fin.
Stingray first aid kits available through DFA, on line or at your favorite retail beach/dive shop…don’t get stung without it!!

Golden Stingray commonly found in the Eastern Atlantic, Mediterranean and Black Sea…

The most common sting ray found in the Eastern Atlantic (North Sea, Baltic to Mauritania) as well as the Mediterranean and Black Sea is the Pastinaca or Golden Stingray. This ray has a rhomboid shaped disc with straight anterior margin and mildly convex posterior margin with a pointed snout and a small protrusion. Generally skittish about human intrusion but has proven tolerant while feeding. This ray is dangerous to swimmers and salt water sports fishermen to poisonous barbed spine.  Don’t forget the shuffle but if you do…

Stingray-kit

Stingray first aid kits available on line or at your favorite retail beach/dive shop…don’t get stung without it!!

 

 

Ocean Care Solutions new Lionfish Sting 1st Aid Kit expands company family of marine sting first aid products

Ocean Care Solutions is devoted to providing safe and effective marine sting first aid products for the consumer.  Our products have been tested true as each individual kit follows the medically accepted first aid protocol supported by life saving agencies, physicians and medical facility research groups worldwide.  Each kit has all the components necessary, with easy to follow instructions, to provide immediate 1st aid medical attention on a variety of marine stingers.  No matter what you pleasure at the ocean; sport fishing, surfing, scuba, distance swimming, snorkeling or just hangin’ out in the surf, always be prepared with Ocean Care Solutions first aid products….Available on line or select retailers…Ask for it by name..You’ll be glad your did !!

ocs fmly5 IMG_0032

 

Field use report from Galveston Island Beach Patrol/Park Board Police Dept

Over this past summer season, Ocean Care Solutions, Inc. provided Chief Peter Davis and supervising staff from the Galveston Island Beach Patrol/Park Board Police Dept. (www.galvestonbeachpatrol.com) with our Stingray and Man o War Sting First Aid Kits.

Here is the e mail OCS received from Chief Davis…

We did get to use the product quite a bit, although we used saline to wash the area as opposed to vinegar, thus following the recommendations of the USLA and medical protocols set by our medical director. People really seemed to respond well to it. They liked the packaging and the way it is a self contained treatment that they could potentially carry with them “just in case”.

Hope things are good with you. We had a fairly easy season as far as stings go, but enough for all of our supervisors to be able to use the product.

Take care,
Peter

Chief Peter Davis
Galveston Island Beach Patrol/Park Board Police Dept

Deadly Jellyfish Weapons Explained..COS Heidelberg University

Heidelberg researchers have succeeded in unravelling the defense mechanisms of jellyfish. Scientists working with Prof. Dr. Thomas Holstein and Dr. Suat Özbek from the Centre for Organismal Studies (COS) of Heidelberg University, together with collaborators from the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), analyzed the proteome, or full set of proteins, of the stinging cells in the freshwater polyp Hydra. The results of their research reveal a complex mixture of toxic and structural proteins that can explain the extraordinary toxicity and biophysical properties of these unique cells.

They also show how the energy for discharging the toxin can be stored in the stinging cells and released at extraordinary speed.  With their poison cells, jellyfish and other cnidarians have developed one of the most venomous and differentiated cellular mechanisms in the animal kingdom. Stinging cells, also known as nematocysts or cnidocysts, are found in the outer cell layer of cnidarians and are used for capturing prey or for defense. They consist mainly of a stinging capsule, a giant secretory vesicle. Inside this organelle a long, barbed tubule is coiled up, which turns inside out like the finger of a glove during discharge, thus releasing the deadly poison into the prey.

This mixture of previously unknown toxins paralyses the nervous system of the prey and destroys their cells. Injecting the toxins requires an effective mechanism. Studies have shown that the discharge of toxins is associated with an extremely high pressure of 15 megapascals, whereby the stylet, a thin barb, is able to penetrate even thick crustacean shells. The stylet is accelerated at a force of 5 million g in under 700 nanoseconds, making the discharge of toxins harpoon-like.

Up until now, the molecular components responsible for the biomechanical properties of these unique cellular weapons were largely unknown. The Heidelberg scientists used protein mass spectroscopy to study the cells of the Hydra magnipapillata freshwater polyp. The procedure afforded them a precise qualitative and quantitative analysis of the chemical composition of the substances, thus enabling them to map the nematocyst proteome of the Hydra. Prof. Holstein and Dr. Özbek’s research team were surprised at its complexity. The biologists discovered 410 proteins with venomous and lytic, but also adhesive or fibrous properties. The proteins of the stinging capsule wall contain hitherto unknown structural components that form a tissue-like matrix, a complex protein mesh. This structure of collagen and elastomers surpasses the elasticity and tensile strength of even spider’s silk.

These findings allow the Heidelberg researchers to explain how the energy for discharging the toxin can be stored in the stinging cells and then released from the elastic structure of the capsule wall in nanoseconds at an extraordinary speed.  “The poison cells of the cnidarians represent an effective combination of the powerful molecular spring mechanism and a structure with extreme biophysical properties,” says Holstein.

The studies also suggest that the organelles containing the injectable toxin have adopted the molecular properties of connective tissue proteins such as collagens during their development. According to Prof. Holstein, it was an unexpected solution in early evolution to develop such a sophisticated mechanism for prey capture and defense.

If you get stung, use Ocean Care Solutions Jellyfish Sting Relief spray…proven effective on a wide variety of jelly stings….Don’t get stung without it !!

Article courtesy of Evironmentail Protection/www.eponline.com

Jellyfish on the rise: UBC study

Jellyfish are increasing in the majority of the world’s coastal ecosystems, according to the first global study of jellyfish abundance by University of British Columbia researchers.

In a study published in this month’s edition of the journal Hydrobiologia, UBC scientists examined data for numerous species of jellyfish for 45 of the world’s 66 Large Marine Ecosystems. They found increasing jellyfish populations in 62 per cent of the regions analyzed, including East Asia, the Black Sea, the Mediterranean, the Northeast U.S. Shelf, Hawaii, and Antarctica.

“There has been anecdotal evidence that jellyfish were on the rise in recent decades, but there hasn’t been a global study that gathered together all the existing data until now,” says Lucas Brotz, a PhD student with the Sea Around Us Project at UBC and lead author of the study.

“Our study confirms these observations scientifically after analysis of available information from 1950 to the present for more than 138 different jellyfish populations around the world.”

Jellyfish directly interfere with many human activities – by stinging swimmers, clogging intakes of power plants, and interfering with fishing. Some species of jellyfish are now a food source in some parts of the world.

“By combining published scientific data with other unpublished data and observations, we could make this study truly global – and offer the best available scientific estimate of a phenomenon that has been widely discussed,” says Daniel Pauly, principal investigator of the Sea Around Us Project and co-author of the study. “We can also see that the places where we see rising numbers of jellyfish are often areas heavily impacted by humans, through pollution, overfishing, and warming waters.”

Map of population trends of native and invasive species of jellyfish by LME. Red: increase (high certainty); orange: increase (low certainty); green stable/variable; blue decrease, grey: no data. Circles represent jellyfish populations with relative sizes reflecting confidence in the data.

Pauly adds that increasing anecdotal reports of jellyfish abundance may have resulted from an expansion of human activities in marine habitats, so the study also provides a concrete baseline for future studies.

The study also notes decreases in jellyfish abundance in seven per cent of coastal regions, while the remainder of the marine ecosystems showed no obvious trend.

Article and data courtesy of Lucas Brotz, PhD student with the Sea Around Us Project at UBC and lead author of the study.