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Jellyfish return to nation’s coast

They’re back!  And we’re not talking hurricanes, though that season is officially underway.  And, no, this is not about sharks, since Discovery’s Shark Week doesn’t start until August.

No, it’s time for the increasingly unpopular annual return of swarms of jellyfish to beaches around the world. Last year they made much of the western Mediterranean unswimmable. A couple of weekend’s ago – the official start of summer — thousands of nasty, golf-ball sized jellyfish washed ashore on Florida’s east coast, stinging beach goers as they arrive. Red and Purple warning flags were posted on beaches from Cocoa Beach to Cape Canaveral.

In large part thanks to the over fishing of big predator fish and warmer ocean waters, jellies are showing up sooner, in bigger numbers and far beyond home territories. For the first time since 2006, the Portuguese Man o War are in numbers along the New England coast particularly the Hamptons.  In Florida they clogged the shallows and took over the wet sand of the beach. Lifeguard stands stocked up with vinegar-and-water solutions to help try and diffuse the itching, burning and rashes, which beats urinating on them, though its proven that OCS Jellyfish sting relief neutralizes the sting and helps alleviate itching and swelling.

IMG_3501     ManOWar-kit

Despite air temps in the 90’s and water temperature of 80+, it’s not just the abundance of jellyfish in Florida’s that was surprising, it was the species. Large numbers of animals washing ashore are the Pelagia Noctiluca or mauve stinger, the cannonball and the Portuguese Man o War although not in abundance yet.  Compact but fitted with long tentacles, these are exactly the same jellyfish that harassed Mediterranean beaches during the summer of 2012 and present this summer.

jellyfish..Mauve

Scientists believe they were transported across the Atlantic in the Gulf Stream, which wraps around the coast of Florida, suggesting they will be a hindrance on many Gator state beaches this summer. Meanwhile across the pond, biologists who study the Irish Sea are blaming a similar boom in jellyfish there on the overfishing of herring, which has given jellyfish an “exponential boost” in population. The trend has been growing since 2005.

Though explanation for why these jellyfish on these beaches is still being studied, it’s clear that since humankind has taken 100 to 120 million tons of predators out of the sea in the past 20 years it’s left plenty of room for jellyfish populations to boom. Jellyfish thrive in disturbed marine ecosystems, from dead zones to seabeds that have been raked by trawling nets. And they are spreading around the world thanks to powerful currents and aided by stowing away on fleets of ships delivering goods around the globe.

Be sure to take along Ocean Care Solutions marine sting 1st aid products..your Solution for marine sting injuries…

Ocean Care Solutions new Lionfish Sting 1st Aid Kit expands company family of marine sting first aid products

Ocean Care Solutions is devoted to providing safe and effective marine sting first aid products for the consumer.  Our products have been tested true as each individual kit follows the medically accepted first aid protocol supported by life saving agencies, physicians and medical facility research groups worldwide.  Each kit has all the components necessary, with easy to follow instructions, to provide immediate 1st aid medical attention on a variety of marine stingers.  No matter what you pleasure at the ocean; sport fishing, surfing, scuba, distance swimming, snorkeling or just hangin’ out in the surf, always be prepared with Ocean Care Solutions first aid products….Available on line or select retailers…Ask for it by name..You’ll be glad your did !!

ocs fmly5 IMG_0032

 

Lionfish envenomation 1st aid kit developed by Ocean Care Solutions

Lionfish are colorful marine fish with venomous spiky fin rays. Its presence is increasing around the seas of the world and present a danger to fishermen, divers and swimmers. Its venom can lead to extreme pain, nausea, vomiting, fever, breathing difficulties, convulsions, dizziness, redness on the affected area, headaches, and numbness although its venom is rarely fatal.

This chilling animated graphic shows the population explosion of poisonous lionfish in Florida, the Caribbean, the Bahamas and the Atlantic seaboard between 1986 and 2011: http://nas.er.usgs.gov/taxgroup/fish/Lionfishanimation.gif 

Treating Lionfish Sting Injuries

Being stung by the long, thin, needle-sharp spines of even a small lionfish generally results in a fire-like pain which is often localized to the area stung, but may travel along the extremity. Expect swelling. Needless to say, a sting to the head, neck or body cavity is more serious and should be considered a medical emergency. It is possible that a portion of the spine may break off in the wound, requiring surgical intervention. Infection is always a possibility. A host of other symptoms and complications are possible.

First-aid for a lionfish sting (before you can get to a doctor) mainly consists of applying heat, which destroys the venom. The problem is, where are you going to get heat if you are out on a boat or standing on a dock?

Ocean Care Solutions has developed a lionfish sting first-aid kit that has what you need. It should be available around mid-January 2013 and will retail for around $20. The supplies contained in the kit are based on treatment protocols with scientific and medical support and derive from medical data and injury reports.
Ocean Care Solutions Lionfish Sting First-Aid Kit

What’s in the OCS Lionfish Sting First-Aid Kit?

  • Moist towelette for cleaning hands
  • Latex-free gloves
  • Gauze pad to help slow bleeding
  • Sterile saline solution for rinsing wound
  • Forceps / tweezers to remove spines
  • Instant Heat Pack to alleviate pain
  • Elastic wrap for holding heat pack in place
  • Ocean Care Solutions triple antibiotic ointment
  • Adhesive bandages

Ocean Care Solutions is a pioneer in the development of effective, convenient and affordable first-aid kits for marine sting injuries, including for jellyfish, stingrays, sea urchins, fire-coral, and Portuguese Man-of-War.

Ocean Care Solutions’ products were nominated for the 2012 World Open Water Swimming Offering of the Year.

Below are the instructions as shown on the back of the foil packet which houses the kit. Click on the image below to enlarge it enough to read:

Click image to enlarge

Content courtesy of David McRee..Beachhunter.net

http://www.blogthebeach.com/2012/nature/fish/lionfish-in-florida-problems-and-solutions

Field use report from Galveston Island Beach Patrol/Park Board Police Dept

Over this past summer season, Ocean Care Solutions, Inc. provided Chief Peter Davis and supervising staff from the Galveston Island Beach Patrol/Park Board Police Dept. (www.galvestonbeachpatrol.com) with our Stingray and Man o War Sting First Aid Kits.

Here is the e mail OCS received from Chief Davis…

We did get to use the product quite a bit, although we used saline to wash the area as opposed to vinegar, thus following the recommendations of the USLA and medical protocols set by our medical director. People really seemed to respond well to it. They liked the packaging and the way it is a self contained treatment that they could potentially carry with them “just in case”.

Hope things are good with you. We had a fairly easy season as far as stings go, but enough for all of our supervisors to be able to use the product.

Take care,
Peter

Chief Peter Davis
Galveston Island Beach Patrol/Park Board Police Dept

Jellyfish at the National Aquarium in Baltimore, MD

An assortment of jellyfish at the National Aquarium’s Jellies Invasion exhibit in Baltimore, MD. Jellyfish featured in the exhibit include: Atlantic Sea Nettle, Pacific Sea Nettle, Purple Striped Jelly, Moon Jelly, Spotted Lagoon Jelly, Blue Blubber Jelly, Upside-Down Jelly, Leidy’s Comb Jelly, Northern Sea Nettle, Black Sea Nettle, Lion’s Mane Jelly, and Egg Yolk Jelly. Enjoy.

If you get stung by any of these animals, use Ocean Care Solutions’ Jellyfish Sting Relief..Fast acting, safe and effective..Don’t get stung without it  !!

 

What is a Jellyfish ??

What Is a Jellyfish?

Portuguese Man-of-War

© Alex Edmonds | Dreamstime.com

The Portuguese man-of-war is not technically a jellyfish; at least it is not a “true” jellyfish. The man-of-war belongs to a large group of similar creatures (of the subphylum Medusozoa). This grouping is divided into four classes, but only one of them includes the true jellyfish.

The man-of-war is a Hydrozoa, which consists primarily of colonial creatures made of several zooids connected together.

True jellyfish are single organisms that belong to the class Scyphozoa, which includes moon (or common) jellyfish and lion’s mane jellyfish. They have stingers and two life phases like men-of-war, but their dome-shaped bodies display a beautiful four-part symmetry.

There are two other classes. The first, Cubozoa, are square-shaped creatures known for their extremely potent venom, like the Irukandji jellyfish and box jellies (also known as sea wasps). Staurozoa, the second, have unique life cycles and live out their days attached to the seafloor. They look more like sea anemones than jellyfish.

www.oceancaresolutions.com

Jellyfish Sting Relief Solution contains 5% acetic acid.. proven effective, medically and scientifically supported and lidocaine free..Don’t get stung without it  !!

Available on line or at your favorite retailer Jan. 2012

Article courtesy of

Heather Brinson Bruce  Answers

A few facts about jellyfish…

  • A group of jellyfish can be called a “bloom,” a “swarm” or a “smack.”
  • The lion’s mane jellyfish might be the longest animal in the world. Its thin tentacles can reach up to 120 feet long.
  • The Nomura’s jellyfish might be the largest jellyfish. Average specimens weigh 330 pounds, and the largest can reach 440 pounds.
  • Since jellyfish aren’t really fish, many scientists prefer to call them “jellies” or “sea jellies” instead.
  • Take them out of the water, though, and they become boring blobs. Why? Their bodies are more than 90 percent water!
  • Jellyfish don’t have bones, brains, hearts, blood or a central nervous system. Instead, they sense the world around them with a loose network of nerves called a “nerve net.”

Jellyfish consist of three basic layers. The outer layer, called the “epidermis,” contains the nerve net.

The middle layer is made of “mesoglea,” the thick, elastic stuff that looks like jelly. The final, inner layer is called the “gastrodermis.”

The most recognizable feature of a jellyfish is its tentacles that hang down from its body. Fascinating to look at, these tentacles can be dangerous to touch.  Jellyfish can sting with their tentacles. They use them to stun prey before they eat them.

Jellyfish don’t purposefully attack humans. Most jellyfish stings occur when someone accidentally touches a jellyfish. Even a dead jellyfish can sting!

How harmful a jellyfish sting is depends on the type of jellyfish. Some jellyfish stings have little or no effect on humans, while others may cause minor discomfort to extreme pain.  The sting of a few types of jellyfish, though — such as the Australian sea wasp, the Irukandji and thePortuguese man-of-war — can be potentially fatal.

Don’t get stung without it !!

 

Information courtesy of Wonderopolis

How intelligent are jellyfish?

by Neil Kelley..

In short: Cnidarians have a simple nervous system — but given their relatively simple hardware they show surprisingly sophisticated behavior.

Jellyfish have a decentralized nervous system (nerve net) coupled with a variety of relatively sophisticated sensory organs to detect light, orientation, salinity and physical stimulus and they can respond in a rapid and coordinated manner to these stimuli [1]. Jellyfish also show evidence of habituation to repeated stimuli suggesting a capacity for information storage in their relatively simple nervous system [2]. Arguably the most sophisticated jellyfish are the cubozans (box jellyfish) which possess complex image forming eyes and are capable of navigating complicated, obstacle laden environments [3].

1 – Albert 2011 “What’s on the mind of a jellyfish? A review of behavioral observations on Aurelia sp. jellyfish” Neuroscience and Bioehavioral Reviewsdoi:10.1016/j.neubiorev.2010.06.001

2 – Johnson and Wuensch 1994 “An investigation of habituation in the jellyfish, Aurelia aurita”Behavioral and Neural Biology
doi:10.1016/S0163-1047(05)80044-5

3 – Coates et al. 2006 “The spectral sensitivity of the lens eyes of a box jellyfish”JEB 
doi: 10.1242/​jeb.02431

www.oceancaresolutions.com

Jellyfish Sting Relief Solution available now…

Don’t get stung without it !!

 

Atlantic sea nettle or East Coast sea nettle…

Chrysaora quinquecirrha known as the Atlantic sea nettle or East Coast sea nettle is a species of jellyfish that inhabits Atlantic estuaries, such as the Chesapeake Bay. It is smaller than the Pacific sea nettle, and has more variable coloration, but is typically pale, pinkish or yellowish, often with radiating more deeply-colored stripes on the exumbrella, especially near the margin.  Click on the link for video:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Chrysaora_quinquecirrha-Sea_nettle_(jellyfish).ogg

The nettle’s sting is rated from “moderate” to “severe” and can be pernicious to smaller prey; it is not, however, potent enough to cause human death, except by allergic reaction. While the sting is not particularly harmful, it can cause moderate discomfort to any individual stung. The sting can be effectively neutralized by misting vinegar over the affected area. This keeps unfired nematocysts from firing and adding to the discomfort.

New shipment of Ocean Care Solutions’ Jellyfish sting relief solution available Nov 10th..Fast, proven effective and safe..Lidocaine Free !!

Don’t get stung without it !!

The Sea Whip coral has 8 tentacles…

The Sea Whip, or soft corals, are colonial cnidarians so named because they lack the permanent, rigid skeleton of hard corals. As octocorallians, they possess 8 tentacles and 8 complete mesentaries. Leptogorgia virgulata colonies are moderately branching into whip-like stalks with 8 tentacles that can cause discomfort. Polyps occur in multiple rows along 2 sides of each branch and the branch color is variable ranging from shades of purple, red, orange or yellow. Polyps are white.  Theses corals are found from New York and the Chesapeake Bay to Florida and Brazil.

www.oceancaresolutions.com

 

Use our Fire Coral kit or our new Jellyfish Sting Relief solution with 5% acetic acid designed to provide effective, safe first aid relief on a number of marine stings..


Don’t get stung without it !!