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Ocean Care Solutions new Lionfish Sting 1st Aid Kit expands company family of marine sting first aid products

Ocean Care Solutions is devoted to providing safe and effective marine sting first aid products for the consumer.  Our products have been tested true as each individual kit follows the medically accepted first aid protocol supported by life saving agencies, physicians and medical facility research groups worldwide.  Each kit has all the components necessary, with easy to follow instructions, to provide immediate 1st aid medical attention on a variety of marine stingers.  No matter what you pleasure at the ocean; sport fishing, surfing, scuba, distance swimming, snorkeling or just hangin’ out in the surf, always be prepared with Ocean Care Solutions first aid products….Available on line or select retailers…Ask for it by name..You’ll be glad your did !!

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Lionfish envenomation 1st aid kit developed by Ocean Care Solutions

Lionfish are colorful marine fish with venomous spiky fin rays. Its presence is increasing around the seas of the world and present a danger to fishermen, divers and swimmers. Its venom can lead to extreme pain, nausea, vomiting, fever, breathing difficulties, convulsions, dizziness, redness on the affected area, headaches, and numbness although its venom is rarely fatal.

This chilling animated graphic shows the population explosion of poisonous lionfish in Florida, the Caribbean, the Bahamas and the Atlantic seaboard between 1986 and 2011: http://nas.er.usgs.gov/taxgroup/fish/Lionfishanimation.gif 

Treating Lionfish Sting Injuries

Being stung by the long, thin, needle-sharp spines of even a small lionfish generally results in a fire-like pain which is often localized to the area stung, but may travel along the extremity. Expect swelling. Needless to say, a sting to the head, neck or body cavity is more serious and should be considered a medical emergency. It is possible that a portion of the spine may break off in the wound, requiring surgical intervention. Infection is always a possibility. A host of other symptoms and complications are possible.

First-aid for a lionfish sting (before you can get to a doctor) mainly consists of applying heat, which destroys the venom. The problem is, where are you going to get heat if you are out on a boat or standing on a dock?

Ocean Care Solutions has developed a lionfish sting first-aid kit that has what you need. It should be available around mid-January 2013 and will retail for around $20. The supplies contained in the kit are based on treatment protocols with scientific and medical support and derive from medical data and injury reports.
Ocean Care Solutions Lionfish Sting First-Aid Kit

What’s in the OCS Lionfish Sting First-Aid Kit?

  • Moist towelette for cleaning hands
  • Latex-free gloves
  • Gauze pad to help slow bleeding
  • Sterile saline solution for rinsing wound
  • Forceps / tweezers to remove spines
  • Instant Heat Pack to alleviate pain
  • Elastic wrap for holding heat pack in place
  • Ocean Care Solutions triple antibiotic ointment
  • Adhesive bandages

Ocean Care Solutions is a pioneer in the development of effective, convenient and affordable first-aid kits for marine sting injuries, including for jellyfish, stingrays, sea urchins, fire-coral, and Portuguese Man-of-War.

Ocean Care Solutions’ products were nominated for the 2012 World Open Water Swimming Offering of the Year.

Below are the instructions as shown on the back of the foil packet which houses the kit. Click on the image below to enlarge it enough to read:

Click image to enlarge

Content courtesy of David McRee..Beachhunter.net

http://www.blogthebeach.com/2012/nature/fish/lionfish-in-florida-problems-and-solutions

Field use report from Galveston Island Beach Patrol/Park Board Police Dept

Over this past summer season, Ocean Care Solutions, Inc. provided Chief Peter Davis and supervising staff from the Galveston Island Beach Patrol/Park Board Police Dept. (www.galvestonbeachpatrol.com) with our Stingray and Man o War Sting First Aid Kits.

Here is the e mail OCS received from Chief Davis…

We did get to use the product quite a bit, although we used saline to wash the area as opposed to vinegar, thus following the recommendations of the USLA and medical protocols set by our medical director. People really seemed to respond well to it. They liked the packaging and the way it is a self contained treatment that they could potentially carry with them “just in case”.

Hope things are good with you. We had a fairly easy season as far as stings go, but enough for all of our supervisors to be able to use the product.

Take care,
Peter

Chief Peter Davis
Galveston Island Beach Patrol/Park Board Police Dept

Jellyfish at the National Aquarium in Baltimore, MD

An assortment of jellyfish at the National Aquarium’s Jellies Invasion exhibit in Baltimore, MD. Jellyfish featured in the exhibit include: Atlantic Sea Nettle, Pacific Sea Nettle, Purple Striped Jelly, Moon Jelly, Spotted Lagoon Jelly, Blue Blubber Jelly, Upside-Down Jelly, Leidy’s Comb Jelly, Northern Sea Nettle, Black Sea Nettle, Lion’s Mane Jelly, and Egg Yolk Jelly. Enjoy.

If you get stung by any of these animals, use Ocean Care Solutions’ Jellyfish Sting Relief..Fast acting, safe and effective..Don’t get stung without it  !!

 

Since discovery in 1870, the Lion's Mane is still the largest jellyfish

Way back in 1870, a Lion’s Mane Jellyfish washed ashore in Massachusetts Bay. Jellyfish wash up all the time, but this one was special… this one has a bell that was 7’6″ in diameter and tentacles that were nearly 120 ft long! That means that the Lion’s Mane Jellyfish might just be the  longest animal alive!

The Lion’s Mane Jellyfish doesn’t always grow that large. In fact, most of the time their bell is only around a few feet wide, and those that live in the warmer waters max out around a foot and a half. Basically, the colder the water the larger they grow! The species is rarely found at latitudes lower than 42 degrees, and are nonexistent in the Southern Hemisphere.

All Lion’s Manes, regardless of size, have tentacles that are clustered into eight segments. There are at least 65 tentacles per segment, though there can be as many as 150, and these tentacles can grow over 100ft long!

If you touch the tentacle of a Lion’s Mane Jellyfish, you will probably get stung.. which results in blistering, irritation, and muscle cramps. Stings are not thought to be fatal to humans.

Take along Ocean Care Solutions Jellyfish Sting Relief…safe and effective, Don’t get stung without it..!!

Blog courtesy of Lauren animaladay.blogspot.com

Beachhunter.net reviews OCS marine sting products…

Produced by David McRee from www.blogthebeach.com…David is not a member of the staff at OCS, he was not paid a fee for service nor does he sell our line of products.  Mr McRee provides helpful tips and information about a variety of human interest topics related to Florida beaches, beach safety and first aid treatments, beach and weather conditions, local news interests, hotel, restaurants, rentals and much more.  Please check out the Utube video.

 

http://www.blogthebeach.com/2012/nature/jellyfish/product-review-first-aid-kit-for-marine-animal-stings-jellyfish-stingrays-urchins-fire-coral

The Portuguese Man o' War..not a jellyfish after all..

 

OCS Man o War First Aid Kit available on line and at your favorite retailers Jan. 2012…Safe and effective first aid…easy to follow instructions with everything you need for first aid…Don’t get stung without it  !!

What is a Jellyfish ??

What Is a Jellyfish?

Portuguese Man-of-War

© Alex Edmonds | Dreamstime.com

The Portuguese man-of-war is not technically a jellyfish; at least it is not a “true” jellyfish. The man-of-war belongs to a large group of similar creatures (of the subphylum Medusozoa). This grouping is divided into four classes, but only one of them includes the true jellyfish.

The man-of-war is a Hydrozoa, which consists primarily of colonial creatures made of several zooids connected together.

True jellyfish are single organisms that belong to the class Scyphozoa, which includes moon (or common) jellyfish and lion’s mane jellyfish. They have stingers and two life phases like men-of-war, but their dome-shaped bodies display a beautiful four-part symmetry.

There are two other classes. The first, Cubozoa, are square-shaped creatures known for their extremely potent venom, like the Irukandji jellyfish and box jellies (also known as sea wasps). Staurozoa, the second, have unique life cycles and live out their days attached to the seafloor. They look more like sea anemones than jellyfish.

www.oceancaresolutions.com

Jellyfish Sting Relief Solution contains 5% acetic acid.. proven effective, medically and scientifically supported and lidocaine free..Don’t get stung without it  !!

Available on line or at your favorite retailer Jan. 2012

Article courtesy of

Heather Brinson Bruce  Answers

Why use acetic acid (vinegar) on jellyfish stings?

Does vinegar work for all jellyfish stings? And how does it work?

Everyone has a theory on the best treatment for jellyfish stings -
vinegar, hot water, fresh water, urine, cold tea, warm beer.

Queensland experts advise that vinegar is best for jellyfish stings,
but not all stingers should be treated the same way, says Dr Lisa-Ann
Gershwin, director of the Australian Marine Stinger Advisory Service.

Vinegar works extremely well for box jellyfish and their tiny cousins
the irukandji, found northwards along the coast from about where the
Queensland town of Bundaberg sits, says Gershwin.  Gershwin says all
jellyfish use the same delivery systems and triggers.

These nematocysts are little capsules filled with coiled up harpoon-
like barbs.  "Picture a knife serrated on both edges to help anchor it
into its victims flesh when it fires. There's venom on both the inside
and outside of the harpoon.

The capsule has a hair trigger, which is fired mechanically by touch.
It can also be fired by changes in density or chemistry such as ph
differences, or being exposed to fresh rather than salt water.  Although
the mechanism is the same, toxins from different types of jellyfish work
in different ways , which is why some jellyfish stings are more serious
than others. Box jellyfish stings, for example, lock the heart in a
contracted state.
"A box jellyfish sting is the worst imaginable pain, says Gershwin. "It
is instantaneous and feels like boiling oil."
Irukandji stings, on the other hand, start out as a mild sting but
then suddenly cascades 20 to 30 minutes after the sting into the
potentially fatal irukandji syndrome - high blood pressure, vomiting,
body spasms and profuse sweating.  Vinegar and tropical stingers
Scientists still don't know why vinegar works for tropical stingers,
says Gershwin

"We don't know exactly what's going on chemically, so as to why it
works, it's a mystery."  "It's a fluke that we even found out, but it
does work and it works better than anything else ever tested."

According to Gershwin vinegar somehow blocks the nematocysts or stinging
cells ability to fire, "it happens instantaneously as soon as the
vinegar is applied".  "It can't do anything about those that have already
fired, but it stops any more from shooting off. In a typical sting you
get maybe 10 per cent of nematocysts firing. But on a typical tentacle
there will be many thousands that haven't fired off yet."

Rubbing the stingers or pouring fresh water on them, however, should be
avoided, as this will cause the nematocysts to fire and make the sting
much worse, says Gershwin.

"The last thing you want to do is increase your toxic load if you've
already been stung."

Dr. Lisa-Ann Gershwin, the Director of the Australian Marine Stinger 
Advisory Service was interviewed by Stuart Gary. ABC Science



			

The Big Pink…..the jellyfish that feeds on other jellies

Pictured is an adult pink meanie jellyfish measuring nearly three feet (one meter) wide searches the Gulf of Mexico for other jellyfish to eat. (Still from video courtesy Monty Graham, Dauphin Island Sea Lab)

Larger Drymonema can ensnare multiple moon jellyfish at once—one had been found with 34 moon jellyfish in its tentacles.

Since many jellyfish look very similar, past researchers assumed that there are very few jellyfish species. But UC Merced’s Michael Dawson has revealed many cryptic jellyfish—jellies that look the same but are actually separate species.


While the discovery that a single global species might actually be multiple species may seem trivial, it can become important when studying jellyfish ecology, since different species might behave differently.

“It changes the way in which we can study these guys and how they interact with humans and the marine environment,” Bayha said. “And they’re being recognized more and more as a major pest around the world.”

www.oceancaresolutions.com

Jellyfish Sting Relief Solution..

Don’t get stung without it !!