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Ocean Care Solutions new Lionfish Sting 1st Aid Kit expands company family of marine sting first aid products

Ocean Care Solutions is devoted to providing safe and effective marine sting first aid products for the consumer.  Our products have been tested true as each individual kit follows the medically accepted first aid protocol supported by life saving agencies, physicians and medical facility research groups worldwide.  Each kit has all the components necessary, with easy to follow instructions, to provide immediate 1st aid medical attention on a variety of marine stingers.  No matter what you pleasure at the ocean; sport fishing, surfing, scuba, distance swimming, snorkeling or just hangin’ out in the surf, always be prepared with Ocean Care Solutions first aid products….Available on line or select retailers…Ask for it by name..You’ll be glad your did !!

ocs fmly5 IMG_0032

 

Field use report from Galveston Island Beach Patrol/Park Board Police Dept

Over this past summer season, Ocean Care Solutions, Inc. provided Chief Peter Davis and supervising staff from the Galveston Island Beach Patrol/Park Board Police Dept. (www.galvestonbeachpatrol.com) with our Stingray and Man o War Sting First Aid Kits.

Here is the e mail OCS received from Chief Davis…

We did get to use the product quite a bit, although we used saline to wash the area as opposed to vinegar, thus following the recommendations of the USLA and medical protocols set by our medical director. People really seemed to respond well to it. They liked the packaging and the way it is a self contained treatment that they could potentially carry with them “just in case”.

Hope things are good with you. We had a fairly easy season as far as stings go, but enough for all of our supervisors to be able to use the product.

Take care,
Peter

Chief Peter Davis
Galveston Island Beach Patrol/Park Board Police Dept

Are Jellyfish Stings Dangerous?

The effects of jellyfish stings can range from mild pain and stinging, to skin irritations and blisters, to respiratory problems, cardiac arrest, and death. The toxicity of a jellyfish sting depends upon the species of jellyfish and the reaction of a person’s body to the jellyfish venom.

The most toxic type of jellyfish is the Box Jellyfish (Chironex fleckeri and Caruka barnesi) found in Australia and some regions of the Indo-Pacific. The venom of the Box Jellyfish has been known to kill a person in five minutes.

Box Jellyfish

Irukandji…no larger than your thumb nail but extremely venomous…

People react differently to jellyfish stings. Consider a jellyfish sting as a “dose” of poison. The smaller the person, the greater the effect of a jellyfish sting will be. Just as some people are highly allergic to bees and may go into anaphylactic shock from a single sting, other people may be unusually sensitive to jellyfish venom and may have a similar severe reaction.

OCS Jellyfish Sting Relief is very effective on the Box jelly..Our specially formulated 5 % acetic acid (stronger than household vinegar) has proven effective on the Box and a wide variety of jellies and marine stingers but we have not, nor ever plan to test our product on the Irukanji.  Just too dangerous even though we are told by The Marine Sting Institute, Queensland, through their own experience; 5% acetic acid application can relive the pain of the Irukandji but NOT the syndrome..Best to stay away from thse animals all together.

Take it along with you..it works !!!

Text courtesy of Natalie Gibb..About.com

What is a Jellyfish ??

What Is a Jellyfish?

Portuguese Man-of-War

© Alex Edmonds | Dreamstime.com

The Portuguese man-of-war is not technically a jellyfish; at least it is not a “true” jellyfish. The man-of-war belongs to a large group of similar creatures (of the subphylum Medusozoa). This grouping is divided into four classes, but only one of them includes the true jellyfish.

The man-of-war is a Hydrozoa, which consists primarily of colonial creatures made of several zooids connected together.

True jellyfish are single organisms that belong to the class Scyphozoa, which includes moon (or common) jellyfish and lion’s mane jellyfish. They have stingers and two life phases like men-of-war, but their dome-shaped bodies display a beautiful four-part symmetry.

There are two other classes. The first, Cubozoa, are square-shaped creatures known for their extremely potent venom, like the Irukandji jellyfish and box jellies (also known as sea wasps). Staurozoa, the second, have unique life cycles and live out their days attached to the seafloor. They look more like sea anemones than jellyfish.

www.oceancaresolutions.com

Jellyfish Sting Relief Solution contains 5% acetic acid.. proven effective, medically and scientifically supported and lidocaine free..Don’t get stung without it  !!

Available on line or at your favorite retailer Jan. 2012

Article courtesy of

Heather Brinson Bruce  Answers

Jellyfish invasion in New Zealand..Man o War and the Mauve

An invasion of jellyfish has hit Wellington sparking warnings for people to be careful and to keep dogs out of the water.

At least two dogs have been treated after being stung in the water off Lyall Bay and Ritchie Wards, a fisherman off the Petone wharf, this week had to cut his line free after snagging jellyfish.

”As I was bringing in my line it was covered in this thick tentacle sludge,” he said.

Later that evening he saw ”hundreds” of jellyfish at Oriental Bay.

”I would say there were three different types: one that was clear with black/brown spots, another that had a pink centre and lastly a much larger variety … that had a head the size of a large dinner plate, seemed to have an orange-looking core that almost resembled an octopus and long clear tentacles.”

Another reader spotted hundreds off large jellyfish with long tentacles off Scorching Bay.

Shown a photograph of this jellyfish, Otago University marine scientist senior lecturer Miles Lamare said it appeared to be a jellyfish known in Europe as a mauve stinger.

”They will sting but are not deadly as other jellyfish such as the box jellies or Portuguese man-o’-war.”

However, the potentially-fatal Portuguese man-o’-war had been found in New Zealand waters.

Mauve stingers were usually found in open and warm waters, and had been reported in topical waters as densely-packed as 600 individuals per cubic meter or water.

”There is also some thought that numbers of jellyfish are increasing due to climate change and loss of predators,” Dr Lamare said.

Wellington City Council spokesman Richard MacLean visited Lyall Bay beach today and said there were a lot of iridescent blue jellyfish with tentacles up to half-a-metre long washed up.

He warned people to keep their dogs out of the water and away from the high tide mark.

”If these things are stinging dogs it might be good for people to take caution.”

Miramar vet Allan Probert said his surgery had seen two dogs today which had been stung at Lyall Bay Beach.
He speculated they may be Portuguese man-o’-war jellyfish.

Julian Hodge, from Island Bay Marine Education Centre, said Portuguese man-o’-war were tropical and northern sub-tropical jellyfish and it was ”highly unlikely” they had reached Wellington.

The swarms of different jellyfish in Wellington right now had  been brought down the east coast of the North Island in a warm current then got blown back into Wellington when they got hit by strong southerlies in the Cook Strait.

Last summer a swimmer reported seeing two Portuguese man o’ war in the water off Waiheke.

Safe and proven effective…Don’t get stung without it..!!

Why use acetic acid (vinegar) on jellyfish stings?

Does vinegar work for all jellyfish stings? And how does it work?

Everyone has a theory on the best treatment for jellyfish stings -
vinegar, hot water, fresh water, urine, cold tea, warm beer.

Queensland experts advise that vinegar is best for jellyfish stings,
but not all stingers should be treated the same way, says Dr Lisa-Ann
Gershwin, director of the Australian Marine Stinger Advisory Service.

Vinegar works extremely well for box jellyfish and their tiny cousins
the irukandji, found northwards along the coast from about where the
Queensland town of Bundaberg sits, says Gershwin.  Gershwin says all
jellyfish use the same delivery systems and triggers.

These nematocysts are little capsules filled with coiled up harpoon-
like barbs.  "Picture a knife serrated on both edges to help anchor it
into its victims flesh when it fires. There's venom on both the inside
and outside of the harpoon.

The capsule has a hair trigger, which is fired mechanically by touch.
It can also be fired by changes in density or chemistry such as ph
differences, or being exposed to fresh rather than salt water.  Although
the mechanism is the same, toxins from different types of jellyfish work
in different ways , which is why some jellyfish stings are more serious
than others. Box jellyfish stings, for example, lock the heart in a
contracted state.
"A box jellyfish sting is the worst imaginable pain, says Gershwin. "It
is instantaneous and feels like boiling oil."
Irukandji stings, on the other hand, start out as a mild sting but
then suddenly cascades 20 to 30 minutes after the sting into the
potentially fatal irukandji syndrome - high blood pressure, vomiting,
body spasms and profuse sweating.  Vinegar and tropical stingers
Scientists still don't know why vinegar works for tropical stingers,
says Gershwin

"We don't know exactly what's going on chemically, so as to why it
works, it's a mystery."  "It's a fluke that we even found out, but it
does work and it works better than anything else ever tested."

According to Gershwin vinegar somehow blocks the nematocysts or stinging
cells ability to fire, "it happens instantaneously as soon as the
vinegar is applied".  "It can't do anything about those that have already
fired, but it stops any more from shooting off. In a typical sting you
get maybe 10 per cent of nematocysts firing. But on a typical tentacle
there will be many thousands that haven't fired off yet."

Rubbing the stingers or pouring fresh water on them, however, should be
avoided, as this will cause the nematocysts to fire and make the sting
much worse, says Gershwin.

"The last thing you want to do is increase your toxic load if you've
already been stung."

Dr. Lisa-Ann Gershwin, the Director of the Australian Marine Stinger 
Advisory Service was interviewed by Stuart Gary. ABC Science



			

A few facts about jellyfish…

  • A group of jellyfish can be called a “bloom,” a “swarm” or a “smack.”
  • The lion’s mane jellyfish might be the longest animal in the world. Its thin tentacles can reach up to 120 feet long.
  • The Nomura’s jellyfish might be the largest jellyfish. Average specimens weigh 330 pounds, and the largest can reach 440 pounds.
  • Since jellyfish aren’t really fish, many scientists prefer to call them “jellies” or “sea jellies” instead.
  • Take them out of the water, though, and they become boring blobs. Why? Their bodies are more than 90 percent water!
  • Jellyfish don’t have bones, brains, hearts, blood or a central nervous system. Instead, they sense the world around them with a loose network of nerves called a “nerve net.”

Jellyfish consist of three basic layers. The outer layer, called the “epidermis,” contains the nerve net.

The middle layer is made of “mesoglea,” the thick, elastic stuff that looks like jelly. The final, inner layer is called the “gastrodermis.”

The most recognizable feature of a jellyfish is its tentacles that hang down from its body. Fascinating to look at, these tentacles can be dangerous to touch.  Jellyfish can sting with their tentacles. They use them to stun prey before they eat them.

Jellyfish don’t purposefully attack humans. Most jellyfish stings occur when someone accidentally touches a jellyfish. Even a dead jellyfish can sting!

How harmful a jellyfish sting is depends on the type of jellyfish. Some jellyfish stings have little or no effect on humans, while others may cause minor discomfort to extreme pain.  The sting of a few types of jellyfish, though — such as the Australian sea wasp, the Irukandji and thePortuguese man-of-war — can be potentially fatal.

Don’t get stung without it !!

 

Information courtesy of Wonderopolis

How intelligent are jellyfish?

by Neil Kelley..

In short: Cnidarians have a simple nervous system — but given their relatively simple hardware they show surprisingly sophisticated behavior.

Jellyfish have a decentralized nervous system (nerve net) coupled with a variety of relatively sophisticated sensory organs to detect light, orientation, salinity and physical stimulus and they can respond in a rapid and coordinated manner to these stimuli [1]. Jellyfish also show evidence of habituation to repeated stimuli suggesting a capacity for information storage in their relatively simple nervous system [2]. Arguably the most sophisticated jellyfish are the cubozans (box jellyfish) which possess complex image forming eyes and are capable of navigating complicated, obstacle laden environments [3].

1 – Albert 2011 “What’s on the mind of a jellyfish? A review of behavioral observations on Aurelia sp. jellyfish” Neuroscience and Bioehavioral Reviewsdoi:10.1016/j.neubiorev.2010.06.001

2 – Johnson and Wuensch 1994 “An investigation of habituation in the jellyfish, Aurelia aurita”Behavioral and Neural Biology
doi:10.1016/S0163-1047(05)80044-5

3 – Coates et al. 2006 “The spectral sensitivity of the lens eyes of a box jellyfish”JEB 
doi: 10.1242/​jeb.02431

www.oceancaresolutions.com

Jellyfish Sting Relief Solution available now…

Don’t get stung without it !!

 

Atlantic sea nettle or East Coast sea nettle…

Chrysaora quinquecirrha known as the Atlantic sea nettle or East Coast sea nettle is a species of jellyfish that inhabits Atlantic estuaries, such as the Chesapeake Bay. It is smaller than the Pacific sea nettle, and has more variable coloration, but is typically pale, pinkish or yellowish, often with radiating more deeply-colored stripes on the exumbrella, especially near the margin.  Click on the link for video:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Chrysaora_quinquecirrha-Sea_nettle_(jellyfish).ogg

The nettle’s sting is rated from “moderate” to “severe” and can be pernicious to smaller prey; it is not, however, potent enough to cause human death, except by allergic reaction. While the sting is not particularly harmful, it can cause moderate discomfort to any individual stung. The sting can be effectively neutralized by misting vinegar over the affected area. This keeps unfired nematocysts from firing and adding to the discomfort.

New shipment of Ocean Care Solutions’ Jellyfish sting relief solution available Nov 10th..Fast, proven effective and safe..Lidocaine Free !!

Don’t get stung without it !!

The Sea Whip coral has 8 tentacles…

The Sea Whip, or soft corals, are colonial cnidarians so named because they lack the permanent, rigid skeleton of hard corals. As octocorallians, they possess 8 tentacles and 8 complete mesentaries. Leptogorgia virgulata colonies are moderately branching into whip-like stalks with 8 tentacles that can cause discomfort. Polyps occur in multiple rows along 2 sides of each branch and the branch color is variable ranging from shades of purple, red, orange or yellow. Polyps are white.  Theses corals are found from New York and the Chesapeake Bay to Florida and Brazil.

www.oceancaresolutions.com

 

Use our Fire Coral kit or our new Jellyfish Sting Relief solution with 5% acetic acid designed to provide effective, safe first aid relief on a number of marine stings..


Don’t get stung without it !!