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Ocean Care Solutions new Lionfish Sting 1st Aid Kit expands company family of marine sting first aid products

Ocean Care Solutions is devoted to providing safe and effective marine sting first aid products for the consumer.  Our products have been tested true as each individual kit follows the medically accepted first aid protocol supported by life saving agencies, physicians and medical facility research groups worldwide.  Each kit has all the components necessary, with easy to follow instructions, to provide immediate 1st aid medical attention on a variety of marine stingers.  No matter what you pleasure at the ocean; sport fishing, surfing, scuba, distance swimming, snorkeling or just hangin’ out in the surf, always be prepared with Ocean Care Solutions first aid products….Available on line or select retailers…Ask for it by name..You’ll be glad your did !!

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Field use report from Galveston Island Beach Patrol/Park Board Police Dept

Over this past summer season, Ocean Care Solutions, Inc. provided Chief Peter Davis and supervising staff from the Galveston Island Beach Patrol/Park Board Police Dept. (www.galvestonbeachpatrol.com) with our Stingray and Man o War Sting First Aid Kits.

Here is the e mail OCS received from Chief Davis…

We did get to use the product quite a bit, although we used saline to wash the area as opposed to vinegar, thus following the recommendations of the USLA and medical protocols set by our medical director. People really seemed to respond well to it. They liked the packaging and the way it is a self contained treatment that they could potentially carry with them “just in case”.

Hope things are good with you. We had a fairly easy season as far as stings go, but enough for all of our supervisors to be able to use the product.

Take care,
Peter

Chief Peter Davis
Galveston Island Beach Patrol/Park Board Police Dept

Bloodybelly Comb Jellfish..

The bloodybelly comb jellys sparkling display is from light diffracting from tiny transparent, hair-like cilia. These beat continuously as a form of propulsion. In the deep sea, the jelly is nearly invisible; animals that are red appear black and blend into the dark background.

Comb jellys are a kind of jelly thing that aren’t particularly closely related to jellyfish. They swim by beating their so called ‘combs’, which are actually hair-like structures called cilia. You can see rows of them  all along the animal shimmering and glittering in the gloom. They are carnivorous and have two sticky tentacles for capturing prey. This particular comb jelly has a deeply pigmented stomach for masking the bioluminescence of its food. It also looks a bit like a heart, before looking more like some foreboding alien space vessel. Spooky.

 

Utube courtesy of Monterey Bay Aquarium

Content courtesy of realmonstrosities.com

Why use acetic acid (vinegar) on jellyfish stings?

Does vinegar work for all jellyfish stings? And how does it work?

Everyone has a theory on the best treatment for jellyfish stings -
vinegar, hot water, fresh water, urine, cold tea, warm beer.

Queensland experts advise that vinegar is best for jellyfish stings,
but not all stingers should be treated the same way, says Dr Lisa-Ann
Gershwin, director of the Australian Marine Stinger Advisory Service.

Vinegar works extremely well for box jellyfish and their tiny cousins
the irukandji, found northwards along the coast from about where the
Queensland town of Bundaberg sits, says Gershwin.  Gershwin says all
jellyfish use the same delivery systems and triggers.

These nematocysts are little capsules filled with coiled up harpoon-
like barbs.  "Picture a knife serrated on both edges to help anchor it
into its victims flesh when it fires. There's venom on both the inside
and outside of the harpoon.

The capsule has a hair trigger, which is fired mechanically by touch.
It can also be fired by changes in density or chemistry such as ph
differences, or being exposed to fresh rather than salt water.  Although
the mechanism is the same, toxins from different types of jellyfish work
in different ways , which is why some jellyfish stings are more serious
than others. Box jellyfish stings, for example, lock the heart in a
contracted state.
"A box jellyfish sting is the worst imaginable pain, says Gershwin. "It
is instantaneous and feels like boiling oil."
Irukandji stings, on the other hand, start out as a mild sting but
then suddenly cascades 20 to 30 minutes after the sting into the
potentially fatal irukandji syndrome - high blood pressure, vomiting,
body spasms and profuse sweating.  Vinegar and tropical stingers
Scientists still don't know why vinegar works for tropical stingers,
says Gershwin

"We don't know exactly what's going on chemically, so as to why it
works, it's a mystery."  "It's a fluke that we even found out, but it
does work and it works better than anything else ever tested."

According to Gershwin vinegar somehow blocks the nematocysts or stinging
cells ability to fire, "it happens instantaneously as soon as the
vinegar is applied".  "It can't do anything about those that have already
fired, but it stops any more from shooting off. In a typical sting you
get maybe 10 per cent of nematocysts firing. But on a typical tentacle
there will be many thousands that haven't fired off yet."

Rubbing the stingers or pouring fresh water on them, however, should be
avoided, as this will cause the nematocysts to fire and make the sting
much worse, says Gershwin.

"The last thing you want to do is increase your toxic load if you've
already been stung."

Dr. Lisa-Ann Gershwin, the Director of the Australian Marine Stinger 
Advisory Service was interviewed by Stuart Gary. ABC Science



			

Sea Urchins; fun to watch, not much fun to step on…

Sea urchins, in certain settings, are almost cuddly in appearance but of course, that’s not the case.  While urchins can be handled carefully without personal injury or harming the animal, they are not at all fun to step on while surfing, wind surfing, ocean kayaking, open water swimming, sports fishing or just hanging out at the beach.  Aside from providing nice eye appeal and gourmet sushi, stepping on one of these can ruin  your day.

That’s why Ocean Care Solutions created the Sea Urchin First Aid Kit…Go anywhere, light weight (14ozs.), heat sealed, water tight in our distinctive gold foil pouch with easy to read and follow directions to provide medically supported, effective pain relief and first aid attention.

Don’t get stung without it !!

 

A few facts about jellyfish…

  • A group of jellyfish can be called a “bloom,” a “swarm” or a “smack.”
  • The lion’s mane jellyfish might be the longest animal in the world. Its thin tentacles can reach up to 120 feet long.
  • The Nomura’s jellyfish might be the largest jellyfish. Average specimens weigh 330 pounds, and the largest can reach 440 pounds.
  • Since jellyfish aren’t really fish, many scientists prefer to call them “jellies” or “sea jellies” instead.
  • Take them out of the water, though, and they become boring blobs. Why? Their bodies are more than 90 percent water!
  • Jellyfish don’t have bones, brains, hearts, blood or a central nervous system. Instead, they sense the world around them with a loose network of nerves called a “nerve net.”

Jellyfish consist of three basic layers. The outer layer, called the “epidermis,” contains the nerve net.

The middle layer is made of “mesoglea,” the thick, elastic stuff that looks like jelly. The final, inner layer is called the “gastrodermis.”

The most recognizable feature of a jellyfish is its tentacles that hang down from its body. Fascinating to look at, these tentacles can be dangerous to touch.  Jellyfish can sting with their tentacles. They use them to stun prey before they eat them.

Jellyfish don’t purposefully attack humans. Most jellyfish stings occur when someone accidentally touches a jellyfish. Even a dead jellyfish can sting!

How harmful a jellyfish sting is depends on the type of jellyfish. Some jellyfish stings have little or no effect on humans, while others may cause minor discomfort to extreme pain.  The sting of a few types of jellyfish, though — such as the Australian sea wasp, the Irukandji and thePortuguese man-of-war — can be potentially fatal.

Don’t get stung without it !!

 

Information courtesy of Wonderopolis

The Sea Whip coral has 8 tentacles…

The Sea Whip, or soft corals, are colonial cnidarians so named because they lack the permanent, rigid skeleton of hard corals. As octocorallians, they possess 8 tentacles and 8 complete mesentaries. Leptogorgia virgulata colonies are moderately branching into whip-like stalks with 8 tentacles that can cause discomfort. Polyps occur in multiple rows along 2 sides of each branch and the branch color is variable ranging from shades of purple, red, orange or yellow. Polyps are white.  Theses corals are found from New York and the Chesapeake Bay to Florida and Brazil.

www.oceancaresolutions.com

 

Use our Fire Coral kit or our new Jellyfish Sting Relief solution with 5% acetic acid designed to provide effective, safe first aid relief on a number of marine stings..


Don’t get stung without it !!

Jellyfish sting nearly 2,000 people over weekend

Daytona News-Journal

DAYTONA Beach — About 1,300 people got stung by jellyfish today in the surf off Volusia County, a Beach Patrol captain said.

The jellyfish are expected in the water again Monday, said Beach Patrol Capt. Tammy Marris, because no major wind shifts are expected.

The calls for jellyfish stings started about 9 a.m. today and came all day long from New Smyrna Beach north to Ormond Beach.

Nearly 700 swimmers were stung Saturday, Marris said Sunday.

Beach officials have identified two species in the water — moon and cannonball jellyfish — but it is more likely that the moon jellyfish are the ones stinging, Marris said.

“The cannonball jellyfish is not really a stinging jellyfish,” Marris said.

Jellyfish can appear anytime off the beaches, Marris said.

“It’s really not a seasonal thing,” Marris said. “They are at the mercy of the wind and current, so they can show up any time of the year.”

 

Man of War closer to British waters as global warming causes biggest shift of marine life in two million years

Moving closer: The highly venomous Portuguese Man o' War jellyfish is increasingly being found in UK waters

The global warming of sea waters is causing the biggest movement of marine species in two million years, according to a huge new international study by 17 different science institutes

Among the changes recorded by scientists contributing to Project Clamer is the fact that huge blooms of a venomous warm-water species of jellyfish are massing in the North Atlantic.

The Pelagia noctiluca ‘dominates in many areas and outbreaks have become an annual event, forcing the closing of beaches,’ says the report.

‘This form of jellyfish is a gluttonous predator of juvenile fish, so researchers consider its spread a harmful trend.’

However, there was further bad news as the report also warned that the highly-venomous Portuguese Man O’War is also moving closer.

Physalia physalis, a jellyfish-like creature usually found in subtropical waters, is more regularly being discovered in northern Atlantic waters.

The research is to be published this year by Project Clamer, a major collaboration between 17 institutes on climate change and the oceans.

Among the other discoveries in worldwide waters, it was noted that aa 43-foot gray whale was spotted off the Israeli town of Herzliya last year.

Scientists came to a startling conclusion that it must have wandered across the normally icebound route above Canada, where warm weather had briefly opened a clear channel three years earlier.

On a microscopic level, scientists also have found plankton in the North Atlantic where it had not existed for at least 800,000 years.

www.oceancaresolutions.com

The Solution for marine sting injuries..

Don’t get stung without it!!

Aquarium opens new invasive jellyfish exhibit

KURE BEACH | The N.C. Aquarium at Fort Fisher has opened a new exhibit in the Exotic Aquatics Gallery. Staffers have added white-spotted jellyfish (Phyllorhiza punctata) to the collection. Guests can learn more about the life cycle of a jellyfish while viewing these beautiful animals.

White-spotted jellyfish appear blue-gray with white spots atop their prominent bell. Although native to Australia, this particular species has become invasive in the Gulf of Mexico as well as the Atlantic Ocean near the Cape Fear coast.

They usually grow to between 17 and 19 inches in diameter, although the largest white-spotted jellyfish on record, found on Sunset Beach in 2007, measured 28 inches.

The Exotic Aquatics Gallery features nonnative marine species.

This exhibit emphasizes the importance of well-balanced ecosystems. Invasive species can easily disrupt that balance by cutting off resources to other species, changing the chemical makeup of the water, and ultimately causing a shift in the entire food web. This affects every aspect of the way humans enjoy the ocean, from seafood cultivation to a simple day at the beach.

The N.C. Aquarium at Fort Fisher is on U.S. 421 just south of Kure Beach. It’s open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily, closed Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year’s Day. Admission is $8 adults; $7 seniors 62 and up; $6 for ages 3-12 and free for kids under 2; registered groups of N.C. schoolchildren, and NC Aquarium Society members.

For more information, see www.ncaquariums.com.

www.oceancaresolutions.com

The Solution for marine sting injuries…