« Posts under jellyfish sting remedy

Australian Bull Ray….Stingray

The Australian bull ray has a disc that is wider than it is long. The snout is blunt with a skirt-shaped inter nasal flap as well as a single fleshy lobe that surrounds the snout and almost reaches the pectoral fins. The medium-sized eyes are located on the sides of the head and the spiracles are large. The pectoral fins which make up the “wings” of this ray originate below the eyes. The margins of the pectoral fins are deeply concave and the tips are highly angular. There is a small dorsal fin that originates over or just behind the pelvic fin rear tips and is anterior to the spine on the tail. The tail is elongate and whip-like and has a venomous stinging spine located just behind the dorsal fin.
Stingray first aid kits available through DFA, on line or at your favorite retail beach/dive shop…don’t get stung without it!!

Golden Stingray commonly found in the Eastern Atlantic, Mediterranean and Black Sea…

The most common sting ray found in the Eastern Atlantic (North Sea, Baltic to Mauritania) as well as the Mediterranean and Black Sea is the Pastinaca or Golden Stingray. This ray has a rhomboid shaped disc with straight anterior margin and mildly convex posterior margin with a pointed snout and a small protrusion. Generally skittish about human intrusion but has proven tolerant while feeding. This ray is dangerous to swimmers and salt water sports fishermen to poisonous barbed spine.  Don’t forget the shuffle but if you do…

Stingray-kit

Stingray first aid kits available on line or at your favorite retail beach/dive shop…don’t get stung without it!!

 

 

How do Jellyfish sting??

The science of cnidocytes and nematocysts

Sea jellies don’t sting through electricity or by touch. A sea jelly sting through a special type of cell called a Cnidocyte, there are three types of cnidocytes currently known. Spirocysts which entangle their prey, Ptychocysts which build tubes for tube anemones and the most well known Nematocysts. Nematocysts consist of a toxic barb which is coiled on a thread inside the cindocyte, when triggered the barb is ejected almost instantly taking only 700 nanoseconds to fire and firing with a force of five million g’s. A cindoctye can only fire once, and must be replaced when fired a process that could take 2 days.

Sea jellies sting their prey using nematocysts, also called cnidocysts, stinging structures located in specialized cells called cnidocytes, which are characteristic of all Cnidaria. Contact with a jellyfish tentacle can trigger millions of nematocysts to pierce the skin and inject venom, yet only some species’ venom cause an adverse reaction in humans. When a nematocyst is triggered by contact by predator or prey, pressure builds up rapidly inside it up to 2,000 pounds per square inch (14,000 kPa) until it bursts. A lance inside the nematocyst pierces the victim’s skin, and poison flows through into the victim. Touching or being touched by a jellyfish can be very uncomfortable, sometimes requiring medical assistance; sting effects range from no effect to extreme pain to death. Even beached and dying jellyfish can still sting when touched.

Scyphozoan jellyfish stings range from a twinge to tingling to agony. Most jellyfish stings are not deadly, but stings of some species of the class Cubozoa and the Box jellyfish, such as the famous and especially toxic Irukandji jellyfish, can be deadly. Stings may cause anaphylaxis, which can be fatal. Medical care may include administration of an antivenom.

Detailed Video of firing nematocysts

Jellyfish are the major non-polyp form of individuals of the phylum Cnidaria. They are typified as free-swimming marine animals consisting of a gelatinous umbrella-shaped bell and trailing tentacles. The bell can pulsate for locomotion, while stinging tentacles can be used to capture prey.

Jellyfish are found in every ocean, from the surface to the deep sea. A few jellyfish inhabit freshwater. Large, often colorful, jellyfish are common in coastal zones worldwide. Jellyfish have roamed the seas for at least 500 million years, and possibly 700 million years or more, making them the oldest multi-organ animal.

IMG_3501
Re-post of orginal..Posted by Jonathan Lowrie  Musings by a Mad Jellyfish

Ocean Care Solutions new Lionfish Sting 1st Aid Kit expands company family of marine sting first aid products

Ocean Care Solutions is devoted to providing safe and effective marine sting first aid products for the consumer.  Our products have been tested true as each individual kit follows the medically accepted first aid protocol supported by life saving agencies, physicians and medical facility research groups worldwide.  Each kit has all the components necessary, with easy to follow instructions, to provide immediate 1st aid medical attention on a variety of marine stingers.  No matter what you pleasure at the ocean; sport fishing, surfing, scuba, distance swimming, snorkeling or just hangin’ out in the surf, always be prepared with Ocean Care Solutions first aid products….Available on line or select retailers…Ask for it by name..You’ll be glad your did !!

ocs fmly5 IMG_0032

 

Beachhunter.net David McRee product review of Ocean Care Solutions new Lionfish Sting 1st aid kit.

Ocean Care Solutions Does Its Lion Share Of Work

 

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 18, 2012

Posted by Steve Munatones

Ocean Care Solutions Does Its Lion Share Of Work

Ron Adley announced a new Ocean Care Solutions for Lionfish Kit. “The kit will be available by January 15th. It is another product in our increasing line of marine sting products including a newly formulated jellyfish sting relief spray.”Lionfish are colorful marine fish with venomous spiky fin rays. Its presence is increasing around the seas of the world and present a danger to fishermen, divers and swimmers. Its venom can lead to extreme pain, nausea, vomiting, fever, breathing difficulties, convulsions, dizziness, redness on the affected area, headaches, and numbness although its venom is rarely fatal.

As Adley knows well from his travels, lionfish stings can produce discomfort over several days as well as severe allergic reactions that can cause breathing difficulties, swelling of the tongue, and slurred speech.

Ocean Care Solutions‘ products were nominated for the 2012 World Open Water Swimming Offering of the Year.The nomination of Ocean Care Solutions reads, “Care is its middle name. Ocean Care Solutions is working hard to help stem the tide of the pain and discomfort caused by stinging organisms. Its products enable comforting relief from a number of jellyfish, Portuguese man o war, sea urchins, fire coral and stingrays.

Ocean Care Solutions goes beyond supplying a wide range of first aid kits that are widely acclaimed the world over. It provides information, a constant source of education about the global proliferation of jellyfish in the world’s oceans.

For its desire to relief pain by working directly with the stakeholders in the open water swimming world, for its wide range of soothing solutions, for its sharing of information about the sea stingers that are a growing menace in the aquatic world, the Ocean Care Solutions line-up is a worthy nominee for the 2012 WOWSA Open Water Swimming Offering of the Year.”

Copyright © 2012 by Open Water Source

The Mangrove jellyfish…

Mangrove jelly fish (Cassiopea xamachana) is so called because it is mostly found in the roots of mangroves in the southern Gulf of Mexico, Caribbean, and other tropical waters. They are also called the Upside Down jellyfish because they tend to settle upside down in muddy and shallow waters. On first sight, they do not really resemble a jellyfish, instead looking more like a sea anemone, or a bluish green flower on the waterbed. However, this appearance also provides the jellyfish with very effective camouflage and protects it from likely predators.

The jellyfish catches it food, mostly plankton and zooplankton, when it gets paralyzed by these stinging cells. The mangrove jellyfish also have venom filled nematocysts on its tentacles for the same purpose of stinging its prey and then transporting it near the mouth for ingestion. You may be surprised to know that unlike other jellyfish, the mangrove jellyfish does not have only a single mouth. In fact, it has mutated to form a number of secondary mouths. The primary mouth reduces the food into tiny fragments, which are then ingested by these numerous secondary mouths.

As far as humans are concerned, they are most likely to be caught up in the mucus columns in the water that contain stinging cells of the mangrove jellyfish. The stinging cells are slightly toxic in nature and can cause severe itching. However, if a human disturbs an entire swarm of mangrove jellyfish, they will all launch upwards towards the surface of the water together and release more stinging cells into the water. This situation can be vary dangerous to humans.

Ocean Care Solutions..the solution for marine sting injuries…

 

Lethal stings from the Australian box jellyfish could be treated with zinc

Box jellyfish of the Chironex species are among the most venomous animals in the world, capable of killing humans with their sting. Their venom, though, which kills by rapidly punching holes in human red blood cells, can be slowed down by administering zinc, according to research published December 12 in the open access journal PLOS ONE by Angel Yanagihara from the University of Hawaii and colleagues.

The researchers developed ways to extract venom from the jellyfish, and tested it on human blood and on mice. They found that the venom created pores in human red blood cells, making them leak large amounts of potassium, which causes cardiac arrest and death.

As Yanagihara elaborates, “For over 60 years researchers have sought to understand the horrifying speed and potency of the venom of the Australian box jellyfish, arguably the most venomous animal in the world. We have found that a previously disregarded hemolysin can cause an avalanche of reactions in cells. This includes an almost instantaneous, massive release of potassium that can cause acute cardiovascular collapse and death.”

This shows an Australian box jellyfish.

Yanagihara AA, Shohet RV (2012) Cubozoan Venom-Induced Cardiovascular Collapse Is Caused by Hyperkalemia and Prevented by Zinc Gluconate in Mice. PLoS ONE 7(12): e51368. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0051368

(Photo Credit: Robert Hartwick)

The authors treated the cells with a zinc compound which inhibits this process, and found that the treatment could slow the pore-forming process in cells, and increased survival times in the mice treated with the compound, zinc gluconate. The research suggests that the venom’s capacity to increase potassium levels is what makes it so dangerous, and that rapid administration of zinc may be a potential life-saver in human sting victims.

Anatomical facts about jellyfish…

The Jellyfish body consists of over 95% water; most of their umbrella mass is a gelatinous material—the jelly—called mesoglea which is surrounded by two layers of protective skin.  The top layer is called the epidermis, and the inner layer is referred to as gastrodermis, which lines the gut.  Jellyfish do not have specialized digestive, osmoregulatory, central nervous, respiratory or circulatory systems.

Jellyfish have no brain or central nervous system, but employ a loose network of nerves, located in the epidermis, which is called a “nerve net”.  Jellyfish have limited control over movement, but can use their hydrostatic skeleton to navigate through contraction-pulsations of the bell-like body; some species actively swim most of the time, while others are mostly passive.

Although counter to the “brainless jellyfish” hypothesis is that some species explicitly adapt to tidal flux to control their location. In Roscoe Bay. B.C., jellyfish ride the current at ebb tide until they hit a gravel bar, and then descend below the current. They remain in still waters waiting for the tide to rise, ascending and allowing it to sweep them back into the bay. They monitor salinity to avoid fresh water from mountain snow melt, again by diving until they find enough salt.

Some jellyfish also have ocelli: light-sensitive organs that do not form images but which can detect light, and are used to determine up from down, responding to sunlight shining on the water’s surface. These are generally pigment spot ocelli, which have some cells (not all) pigmented.

Certain species of jellyfish, such as the Box jellyfish, have been revealed to be more advanced than their counterparts. The Box jellyfish has 24 eyes, two of which are capable of seeing color, and four parallel brains that act in competition, supposedly making it one of the only creatures to have a 360 degree view of its environment.  It is suggested that the two eyes that contain cornea and retina are attached to a central nervous system which enables the four brains to process images. It is unknown how this works, as this animal has a unique central nervous system.

Information and  photo courtesy wikipedia..

Jimble jellyfish invade Balmoral Beach..Australia

RARE blooms of beautiful but dangerous pink stingers have invaded Balmoral Beach over the past five months, making life tough for ocean swimmers.

Jimble jellyfish, like this one pictured, have been spotted in Balmoral waters since mid June.

Jimbles, box-shaped jellyfish with long tentacles, can give a painful but non-deadly sting, resulting in welts that itch for days.

Balmoral swimmer Dave Sanney has given up going in the water since the swarm hit in mid-June, after he was stung several times.  “The most frequent spot to be stung was close to shore and down near the pipe at the Raglan St end of the beach,” he said.

“The sting is like an electric shock but the itchiness is worse – each time symptoms got more severe.”  Jimbles were also spotted in North Harbour, Manly throughout winter but disappeared in the last three weeks.

Mosman resident Mr Sanney, who has swam at Balmoral for nine years, said jimbles usually floated into Middle Harbour once a year during the warmer months but no one could explain why they appeared so early and in such high numbers this year.

Griffith University jellyfish expect Dr Kylie Pitt said marine scientists knew virtually nothing about jimble ecology but this year had been abundant for all types of jellyfish.

“We’ve had reports of huge blooms of jellyfish on Australia’s east and west coasts this year,” she said.  “Whatever’s promoting that is also promoting high numbers of Jimbles in Sydney waters.”

OCS Jellyfish Sting Relief spray is currently being used in NSW and is proven effective on the Jimble…Don’t get stung without it !!

WHAT ARE JIMBLES?

* Cubozoan jellyfish, pink or clear with a box-shaped bell and tentacles at each corner

* Found in waters from Western Australia to southern QLD and occasionally in Sydney Harbour

* Feed on plankton, will give a nasty but non-deadly sting

* You can track sightings at www.jellywatch.org

Article and picture courtesy of mosman-daily-au