« Posts under marine biologist

Ocean Care Solutions new Lionfish Sting 1st Aid Kit expands company family of marine sting first aid products

Ocean Care Solutions is devoted to providing safe and effective marine sting first aid products for the consumer.  Our products have been tested true as each individual kit follows the medically accepted first aid protocol supported by life saving agencies, physicians and medical facility research groups worldwide.  Each kit has all the components necessary, with easy to follow instructions, to provide immediate 1st aid medical attention on a variety of marine stingers.  No matter what you pleasure at the ocean; sport fishing, surfing, scuba, distance swimming, snorkeling or just hangin’ out in the surf, always be prepared with Ocean Care Solutions first aid products….Available on line or select retailers…Ask for it by name..You’ll be glad your did !!

ocs fmly5 IMG_0032

 

Reducing Lionfish Polulations..

Faced with a dramatic reduction of native populations of fish–which support fishing and diving recreational tourism–nearly everyone is working to reduce the lionfish populations. From spearfishing to hook and lining, any method to get them out of the water is seen as a step in the right direction. Citizen organizations like LionFishHunters and The Lionfish PSA have sprung up to educate the public and direct us toward steps necessary to control this opportunistic species.

Especially in the Florida Keys, locals are trying hard to put lionfish on the menu in seafood restaurants, hoping we can eat them into submission. Lionfish is reported to have an excellent taste and is often compared to hogfish or snapper. It’s not dangerous to eat because the poison is only contained in the spines. The meat is safe to eat.

Want to know how to clean and cook a lionfish? Here’s a great 4 minute video to show you how:

For a very well produced video by CNN on the lionfish problem, check out the 7 minute video below:

Below are some additional links to information about the Florida lionfish “invasion.”

Reef.org – Report a lionfish sighting and learn more about the whole lionfish thing, including links to some restaurants that have lionfish on the menu.

Mote Tropical Research Lab lionfish info. An excellent web site with a lot of information and links to other resources.

Content courtesy of David McRee..Beachhunter.net

http://www.blogthebeach.com/2012/nature/fish/lionfish-in-florida-problems-and-solutions

Related posts:

  1. Indo-Pacific Lionfish Threaten Florida
  2. Product Review: First Aid Kit for Marine Animal Stings: Jellyfish, Stingrays, Urchins, Fire Coral
  3. Dolphin Stranding with Happy Ending

Field use report from Galveston Island Beach Patrol/Park Board Police Dept

Over this past summer season, Ocean Care Solutions, Inc. provided Chief Peter Davis and supervising staff from the Galveston Island Beach Patrol/Park Board Police Dept. (www.galvestonbeachpatrol.com) with our Stingray and Man o War Sting First Aid Kits.

Here is the e mail OCS received from Chief Davis…

We did get to use the product quite a bit, although we used saline to wash the area as opposed to vinegar, thus following the recommendations of the USLA and medical protocols set by our medical director. People really seemed to respond well to it. They liked the packaging and the way it is a self contained treatment that they could potentially carry with them “just in case”.

Hope things are good with you. We had a fairly easy season as far as stings go, but enough for all of our supervisors to be able to use the product.

Take care,
Peter

Chief Peter Davis
Galveston Island Beach Patrol/Park Board Police Dept

Eyes hold clues to life for deadly box jellyfish..Queensland

Scientists in far north Queensland say a new discovery about the life cycle of the deadly box jellyfish will allow them to better predict when swimmers are at risk.

Researchers from James Cook University in Cairns have been able to pinpoint the exact time when box jellyfish turn from polyps into deadly stingers.

JCU Associate Professor Jamie Seymour says until now, there have been serious gaps in understanding when people are most at risk from the deadly animals.

“We’ve had a model for about eight or nine years now that predicts the end of the seasons and it does it really, to within two or three days,” he said.

“We’ve been spot on for the last seven or eight years but we’ve never been able to predict the start of the season.”

One of his PhD students, Matt Gordon, is now solving that mystery.

He has been able to get an insight into exactly when box jellyfish hatch by hunting them down off the far north Queensland coast near Weipa and gouging out their set of 24 eyes.

“It’s a lot like the trunk of a tree, it’s got concentric growth rings inside it and each one of those growth rings is added daily so then we were able to age exactly how old those jellyfish were,” he said.

He found the jellyfish turn from tiny polyps into deadly stingers around September but they do not turn up along the coast and start posing a risk to swimmers until November.

“The next thing I’d like to find out is what do they do in that two to three months? Where are they?” he said.

“We know they’re growing quite quickly so from that tiny size, they do reach a decent size quite quickly but where are they? What are they doing? Why is it a couple of months until they show up along the coastline?”

Professor Seymour says his team of researchers is prepared to put themselves on the line to answer those very questions.

“It’s sort of like working with snakes, as long as you get hold of the non-bitey end you’re away and running, ” he said.

“And having said that, it’s fun and if you take the precautions.”

Ocean Care Solutions Jellyfish Sting Sting Relief is proven effective on the Box jellyfish envenomation.  Made  with medically and scientifically recommended 5% acetci acid active..Don’t get stung without it !!

Article courtesy of ABC News written by Lauren Day

Jellyfish on the rise: UBC study

Jellyfish are increasing in the majority of the world’s coastal ecosystems, according to the first global study of jellyfish abundance by University of British Columbia researchers.

In a study published in this month’s edition of the journal Hydrobiologia, UBC scientists examined data for numerous species of jellyfish for 45 of the world’s 66 Large Marine Ecosystems. They found increasing jellyfish populations in 62 per cent of the regions analyzed, including East Asia, the Black Sea, the Mediterranean, the Northeast U.S. Shelf, Hawaii, and Antarctica.

“There has been anecdotal evidence that jellyfish were on the rise in recent decades, but there hasn’t been a global study that gathered together all the existing data until now,” says Lucas Brotz, a PhD student with the Sea Around Us Project at UBC and lead author of the study.

“Our study confirms these observations scientifically after analysis of available information from 1950 to the present for more than 138 different jellyfish populations around the world.”

Jellyfish directly interfere with many human activities – by stinging swimmers, clogging intakes of power plants, and interfering with fishing. Some species of jellyfish are now a food source in some parts of the world.

“By combining published scientific data with other unpublished data and observations, we could make this study truly global – and offer the best available scientific estimate of a phenomenon that has been widely discussed,” says Daniel Pauly, principal investigator of the Sea Around Us Project and co-author of the study. “We can also see that the places where we see rising numbers of jellyfish are often areas heavily impacted by humans, through pollution, overfishing, and warming waters.”

Map of population trends of native and invasive species of jellyfish by LME. Red: increase (high certainty); orange: increase (low certainty); green stable/variable; blue decrease, grey: no data. Circles represent jellyfish populations with relative sizes reflecting confidence in the data.

Pauly adds that increasing anecdotal reports of jellyfish abundance may have resulted from an expansion of human activities in marine habitats, so the study also provides a concrete baseline for future studies.

The study also notes decreases in jellyfish abundance in seven per cent of coastal regions, while the remainder of the marine ecosystems showed no obvious trend.

Article and data courtesy of Lucas Brotz, PhD student with the Sea Around Us Project at UBC and lead author of the study.

 

About Ocean Care Solution Jellyfish sting relief and how to use it

Marine stings can ruin your day at the beach but it doesn’t have to….not any more.  We created a product formula of 5% acetic acid (vinegar), alcohol and skin components that not only gives our product the look and feel of ordinary skin lotion but provides medically supported and endorsed jellyfish sting first aid pain relief.  Drawn from field trials around  the world, medical and scientific research documents including that from noted authority Paul S. Auerbach, MD, a founder and past President of the Wilderness Medical Society and editor of Wilderness Medicine, 6th Edition, we know first hand it works..Pic during controlled lab tests…

Here’s another…

Our Jellyfish Sting Relief Solution is specially formulated to deliver immediate and meaningful first aid…no topical anesthetic to cover the pain; real pain relief first aid!!  World class open water swimmers are using our products including our Portuguese Man o War 1st Aid Kit…Spray our jellyfish sting solution on & scrape away the pain. One note however, because our product is designed to stay where it is sprayed, the viscosity is such that we ask you pump vigorously until product begins spraying..we are working on a tube sprayer to resolve that…the good news is our product works as advertised..We tested it, we proved it and we are certain of it…Backed by documented medical research.  No more home remedies, myths, or “repellents”, OCS Jellyfish Sting Relief Solution will keep you and your family safe from painful marine stings at the beach or on the water.

Available at retailers and specialty shops.  Ask for it by name ..Don’t get stung without it!!  Look for our full family of marine sting products.

 

 

 

Glaucus Atlanticus Sea Slug: Feeds on the Man o War

Glaucus Atlanticus Sea Slug: Animal Of The Week

The Glaucus Atlanticus Sea Slug is as unusual as its appearance suggests – this thing is honestly pretty weird, but we can forgive it since it is so breath-taking.  These creatures are three centimeters long and predominantly colored with silver and blue tints.  They are found in tropical waters, specifically those off of the coast of Africa and Australia.  Though they exist predominantly in these locations, they can also be found off of European coasts.

The Glaucus Atlanticus Sea Slug floats on top of the water by using it’s gas filled sac.  Surprisingly, these tiny slugs actually feed on large, dangerous, poisonous animals; namely the Portuguese Man O’ War.  Yeah, those are the things that you try to avoid at all costs whenever you go snorkeling in the ocean, because their stings hurt like no other.  According to marine biologists, the sea slug can and usually does consume the entire Man o War organism and absorbs the toxins from the creature it just preyed upon, and then saves that poison as a self-defense mechanism.  Pretty amazing given the size of the Sea Slug.

 

The Flower Hat Jellyfish..Brazil, Argentina and Japan

This jellyfish is a rare species and is generally small in size with a width of just about six inches. It is also known as Olindias Formosa and is very striking with shades of purple and orange colours. It has appearance of having a neon pink flower hat on its head. This is because its tentacles, when not in use, coil up and sticks to the rim. It has a painful sting but non-lethal to humans. It mainly feeds on small fish capturing its prey by injecting venom from its stinging cells its tentacles. It inhabits Brazil, Argentina and Japanese waters.flower hat jelly 10 of the Most Beautiful Jellyfish in the World

Venomous Irukandji in Florida waters??

The Irukandji are tiny and extremely venomous jellyfish that inhabit marine waters of Australia that causes symptoms collectively known as Irukandji syndrome. Its size is roughly no larger than a quarter. There are two known species of Irukandji: Carukia barnesi and the recently discovered Malo kingi.


Irukandji syndrome is produced by a small amount of venom and includes severe pains at various parts of the body (typically excruciating muscle cramps in the arms and legs, severe pain in the back and kidneys, a burning sensation of the skin and face), headaches, nausea, restlessness, sweating, vomiting, an increase in heart rate and blood pressure, and psychological phenomena such as the feeling of impending doom. The sting is moderately irritating; the severe syndrome is delayed for 5–120 minutes (30 minutes on average). The symptoms range from hours to weeks, and victims usually require hospitalization. As with other box jellyfish, vinegar will deactivate unfired nematocysts on the skin but has no effect on the venom already in the body.

Irukandji jellyfish were at one time thought to be in the northern waters of Australia only. Since then, according to a National Geographic documentary on jellyfish, the species has been found in waters as far north as the British Isles, Japan, the Florida coast of the United States.

OCS has never nor likely ever will test use our 5% acetic acid jellyfish sting relief solution on the Irukandji as we have many other sting species of jellies including the Box jellyfish, Caribbean Box and the Winged Box in Hawaiian waters  but, according to the University of Queensland and the Australian Resuscitation Council, vinegar can and does neutralize any firing nematocyst but once the toxin from an Irukandji is injected into a person, there’s nothing to do but go to the hospital post haste!!

Ocean Care Solution Portuguese Man o War First Aid Kit.

http://www.prweb.com/releases/2012/3/prweb9280505.htm