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Ocean Care Solutions new Lionfish Sting 1st Aid Kit expands company family of marine sting first aid products

Ocean Care Solutions is devoted to providing safe and effective marine sting first aid products for the consumer.  Our products have been tested true as each individual kit follows the medically accepted first aid protocol supported by life saving agencies, physicians and medical facility research groups worldwide.  Each kit has all the components necessary, with easy to follow instructions, to provide immediate 1st aid medical attention on a variety of marine stingers.  No matter what you pleasure at the ocean; sport fishing, surfing, scuba, distance swimming, snorkeling or just hangin’ out in the surf, always be prepared with Ocean Care Solutions first aid products….Available on line or select retailers…Ask for it by name..You’ll be glad your did !!

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Lionfish envenomation 1st aid kit developed by Ocean Care Solutions

Lionfish are colorful marine fish with venomous spiky fin rays. Its presence is increasing around the seas of the world and present a danger to fishermen, divers and swimmers. Its venom can lead to extreme pain, nausea, vomiting, fever, breathing difficulties, convulsions, dizziness, redness on the affected area, headaches, and numbness although its venom is rarely fatal.

This chilling animated graphic shows the population explosion of poisonous lionfish in Florida, the Caribbean, the Bahamas and the Atlantic seaboard between 1986 and 2011: http://nas.er.usgs.gov/taxgroup/fish/Lionfishanimation.gif 

Treating Lionfish Sting Injuries

Being stung by the long, thin, needle-sharp spines of even a small lionfish generally results in a fire-like pain which is often localized to the area stung, but may travel along the extremity. Expect swelling. Needless to say, a sting to the head, neck or body cavity is more serious and should be considered a medical emergency. It is possible that a portion of the spine may break off in the wound, requiring surgical intervention. Infection is always a possibility. A host of other symptoms and complications are possible.

First-aid for a lionfish sting (before you can get to a doctor) mainly consists of applying heat, which destroys the venom. The problem is, where are you going to get heat if you are out on a boat or standing on a dock?

Ocean Care Solutions has developed a lionfish sting first-aid kit that has what you need. It should be available around mid-January 2013 and will retail for around $20. The supplies contained in the kit are based on treatment protocols with scientific and medical support and derive from medical data and injury reports.
Ocean Care Solutions Lionfish Sting First-Aid Kit

What’s in the OCS Lionfish Sting First-Aid Kit?

  • Moist towelette for cleaning hands
  • Latex-free gloves
  • Gauze pad to help slow bleeding
  • Sterile saline solution for rinsing wound
  • Forceps / tweezers to remove spines
  • Instant Heat Pack to alleviate pain
  • Elastic wrap for holding heat pack in place
  • Ocean Care Solutions triple antibiotic ointment
  • Adhesive bandages

Ocean Care Solutions is a pioneer in the development of effective, convenient and affordable first-aid kits for marine sting injuries, including for jellyfish, stingrays, sea urchins, fire-coral, and Portuguese Man-of-War.

Ocean Care Solutions’ products were nominated for the 2012 World Open Water Swimming Offering of the Year.

Below are the instructions as shown on the back of the foil packet which houses the kit. Click on the image below to enlarge it enough to read:

Click image to enlarge

Content courtesy of David McRee..Beachhunter.net

http://www.blogthebeach.com/2012/nature/fish/lionfish-in-florida-problems-and-solutions

Safely Dive With Stingrays…avoid the attack zone..

As they gently glide a few inches above the sand, stingrays appear elegant, peaceful and calm – and they are ninety-nine percent of the time. The only time divers need to worry is when stingrays feel endangered. A frightened sting ray can plunge its sharp, venomous sting straight through a wetsuit and deep into a diver’s flesh.
While diving, stingrays may be approached with little risk. On the rare occasion that a stingray strikes a diver underwater, the diver has most likely inadvertently threatened or cornered the animal. Perhaps the diver hovered directly over the ray or floated in front of it making the stingray feel trapped against a reef without an escape route.
Because a stingray sees and swims forward easily, leave it a forward escape route. Most importantly, stay out a stingray’s striking zone, the area directly above the ray. The ray can easily strike in the area at the top of its back by arching its tail forward. By contrast, the area behind the ray’s back and the space to its sides are difficult for the ray to reach without turning its body or making swimming adjustments. Divers who are alert and aware of the stingray’s attack zone should be relatively safe.

Stingray attacks are more likely to occur to divers who are entering or exiting the ocean through shallow water and accidentally step on a stingray. Naturally the stingray will react. When the stingray is stepped on, it quickly whips its long tail forward and down, which jabs the sting at the base of the tail into the offender. This is a defensive maneuver designed to remove the diver’s foot from the stingray’s body, and it works. To avoid stepping on top of a stingray, divers can shuffle their feet when entering or exiting the water. In addition, divers should be aware of stingray habitats such as long sandy shores. Because neither dive booties nor fins protect a diver from a stingray’s hard, razor sharp sting, the diver should be vigilant if he suspects he might be in a stingray habitat.

Although the possibilities of being stung are in yiour favor, take along our Ocean Care Stingray First Aid Kit.  Everything is there to provide you immediate first aid with easy to follow directions on just what to do..Don’t get stung with out  !!

 

Article and photos courtesy of Natalie Gibb, About.com Guide

Most fire coral frequently has white tips…

Fire coral grows in familiar coral shapes. Divers have reported seeing fire coral in blade, branching, box, and even encrusting forms. As fire coral is easily confused with other corals, color is a good way to identify it. Most fire coral is a brownish-orange or brownish-green. It frequently has white tips, like the fire coral in this photo.

But if you do have an encounter with stinging fire coral, use our Ocean Care Fire Coral First Aid Kit…everything you need is in the bag..air tight, convenient to use and effective !! Don’t going diving without it !!

www.oceancaresolutions.com

photo and txt courtesy of About.com

Fire Coral..beautiful but dangerous..

Don’t learn about fire coral the hard way. Fire coral is related to jellyfish and anemones, and just like these creatures, it can really, really, sting. This Fire coral, Millepora sp., is beautiful, but dangerous.


Learn to identify fire coral and then be sure to avoid it! Divers should be on the look out for fire coral in tropical and subtropical seas. But if you do have an encounter with stinging fire coral, use our Ocean Care Fire Coral First Aid Kit…everything you need is in the bag..air tight, convenient to use and effective !! Don’t going diving without it !!

www.oceancaresolutions.com

photo and txt courtesy of About.com

Bloodybelly Comb Jellfish..

The bloodybelly comb jellys sparkling display is from light diffracting from tiny transparent, hair-like cilia. These beat continuously as a form of propulsion. In the deep sea, the jelly is nearly invisible; animals that are red appear black and blend into the dark background.

Comb jellys are a kind of jelly thing that aren’t particularly closely related to jellyfish. They swim by beating their so called ‘combs’, which are actually hair-like structures called cilia. You can see rows of them  all along the animal shimmering and glittering in the gloom. They are carnivorous and have two sticky tentacles for capturing prey. This particular comb jelly has a deeply pigmented stomach for masking the bioluminescence of its food. It also looks a bit like a heart, before looking more like some foreboding alien space vessel. Spooky.

 

Utube courtesy of Monterey Bay Aquarium

Content courtesy of realmonstrosities.com

Sea Urchins; fun to watch, not much fun to step on…

Sea urchins, in certain settings, are almost cuddly in appearance but of course, that’s not the case.  While urchins can be handled carefully without personal injury or harming the animal, they are not at all fun to step on while surfing, wind surfing, ocean kayaking, open water swimming, sports fishing or just hanging out at the beach.  Aside from providing nice eye appeal and gourmet sushi, stepping on one of these can ruin  your day.

That’s why Ocean Care Solutions created the Sea Urchin First Aid Kit…Go anywhere, light weight (14ozs.), heat sealed, water tight in our distinctive gold foil pouch with easy to read and follow directions to provide medically supported, effective pain relief and first aid attention.

Don’t get stung without it !!

 

Australian Irukandji Syndrome can be deadly….

Irukandji syndrome is a condition that is induced by venomization through the sting of Carukia barnesi, a species of Irukandji jellyfish, and other cubozoans. The condition is rarely fatal, but if immediate medical action is not taken, within only 20 minutes the victim could go into cardiac arrest and die.

The syndrome was given its name in 1952 by Hugo Flecker, after the Aboriginal Irukandji people who live in Palm Cove, north of CairnsAustralia where stings are common.

When properly treated a single sting is normally not fatal; however, two people in Australia are believed to have died from Irukandji stings, which has greatly increased public awareness of Irukandji syndrome. It is unknown how many other deaths from Irukandji syndrome have been wrongly attributed to other causes. The exact mechanism of action of Irukandji venom is unknown. It has been suggested that adrenaline excess may be an underlying mechanism in severe Irukandji syndrome.

The best tact is to avoid the waters when warnings have been posted.  Our team at OCS has been advised by Australian authorities that treatment calls for flushing the wound with vinegar/acetic acid..OCS Jellyfish Sting Relief Solution is a powerful 5% acetic acid that is very effective on a wide range of marine sting injuries but we have not attempted nor will we try our product on the Irukandji.  This is one very dangerous animal !!

www.oceancaresolutions.com

 

A few facts about jellyfish…

  • A group of jellyfish can be called a “bloom,” a “swarm” or a “smack.”
  • The lion’s mane jellyfish might be the longest animal in the world. Its thin tentacles can reach up to 120 feet long.
  • The Nomura’s jellyfish might be the largest jellyfish. Average specimens weigh 330 pounds, and the largest can reach 440 pounds.
  • Since jellyfish aren’t really fish, many scientists prefer to call them “jellies” or “sea jellies” instead.
  • Take them out of the water, though, and they become boring blobs. Why? Their bodies are more than 90 percent water!
  • Jellyfish don’t have bones, brains, hearts, blood or a central nervous system. Instead, they sense the world around them with a loose network of nerves called a “nerve net.”

Jellyfish consist of three basic layers. The outer layer, called the “epidermis,” contains the nerve net.

The middle layer is made of “mesoglea,” the thick, elastic stuff that looks like jelly. The final, inner layer is called the “gastrodermis.”

The most recognizable feature of a jellyfish is its tentacles that hang down from its body. Fascinating to look at, these tentacles can be dangerous to touch.  Jellyfish can sting with their tentacles. They use them to stun prey before they eat them.

Jellyfish don’t purposefully attack humans. Most jellyfish stings occur when someone accidentally touches a jellyfish. Even a dead jellyfish can sting!

How harmful a jellyfish sting is depends on the type of jellyfish. Some jellyfish stings have little or no effect on humans, while others may cause minor discomfort to extreme pain.  The sting of a few types of jellyfish, though — such as the Australian sea wasp, the Irukandji and thePortuguese man-of-war — can be potentially fatal.

Don’t get stung without it !!

 

Information courtesy of Wonderopolis

How intelligent are jellyfish?

by Neil Kelley..

In short: Cnidarians have a simple nervous system — but given their relatively simple hardware they show surprisingly sophisticated behavior.

Jellyfish have a decentralized nervous system (nerve net) coupled with a variety of relatively sophisticated sensory organs to detect light, orientation, salinity and physical stimulus and they can respond in a rapid and coordinated manner to these stimuli [1]. Jellyfish also show evidence of habituation to repeated stimuli suggesting a capacity for information storage in their relatively simple nervous system [2]. Arguably the most sophisticated jellyfish are the cubozans (box jellyfish) which possess complex image forming eyes and are capable of navigating complicated, obstacle laden environments [3].

1 – Albert 2011 “What’s on the mind of a jellyfish? A review of behavioral observations on Aurelia sp. jellyfish” Neuroscience and Bioehavioral Reviewsdoi:10.1016/j.neubiorev.2010.06.001

2 – Johnson and Wuensch 1994 “An investigation of habituation in the jellyfish, Aurelia aurita”Behavioral and Neural Biology
doi:10.1016/S0163-1047(05)80044-5

3 – Coates et al. 2006 “The spectral sensitivity of the lens eyes of a box jellyfish”JEB 
doi: 10.1242/​jeb.02431

www.oceancaresolutions.com

Jellyfish Sting Relief Solution available now…

Don’t get stung without it !!