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Ocean Care Solutions new Lionfish Sting 1st Aid Kit expands company family of marine sting first aid products

Ocean Care Solutions is devoted to providing safe and effective marine sting first aid products for the consumer.  Our products have been tested true as each individual kit follows the medically accepted first aid protocol supported by life saving agencies, physicians and medical facility research groups worldwide.  Each kit has all the components necessary, with easy to follow instructions, to provide immediate 1st aid medical attention on a variety of marine stingers.  No matter what you pleasure at the ocean; sport fishing, surfing, scuba, distance swimming, snorkeling or just hangin’ out in the surf, always be prepared with Ocean Care Solutions first aid products….Available on line or select retailers…Ask for it by name..You’ll be glad your did !!

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Since discovery in 1870, the Lion's Mane is still the largest jellyfish

Way back in 1870, a Lion’s Mane Jellyfish washed ashore in Massachusetts Bay. Jellyfish wash up all the time, but this one was special… this one has a bell that was 7’6″ in diameter and tentacles that were nearly 120 ft long! That means that the Lion’s Mane Jellyfish might just be the  longest animal alive!

The Lion’s Mane Jellyfish doesn’t always grow that large. In fact, most of the time their bell is only around a few feet wide, and those that live in the warmer waters max out around a foot and a half. Basically, the colder the water the larger they grow! The species is rarely found at latitudes lower than 42 degrees, and are nonexistent in the Southern Hemisphere.

All Lion’s Manes, regardless of size, have tentacles that are clustered into eight segments. There are at least 65 tentacles per segment, though there can be as many as 150, and these tentacles can grow over 100ft long!

If you touch the tentacle of a Lion’s Mane Jellyfish, you will probably get stung.. which results in blistering, irritation, and muscle cramps. Stings are not thought to be fatal to humans.

Take along Ocean Care Solutions Jellyfish Sting Relief…safe and effective, Don’t get stung without it..!!

Blog courtesy of Lauren animaladay.blogspot.com

Safely Dive With Stingrays…avoid the attack zone..

As they gently glide a few inches above the sand, stingrays appear elegant, peaceful and calm – and they are ninety-nine percent of the time. The only time divers need to worry is when stingrays feel endangered. A frightened sting ray can plunge its sharp, venomous sting straight through a wetsuit and deep into a diver’s flesh.
While diving, stingrays may be approached with little risk. On the rare occasion that a stingray strikes a diver underwater, the diver has most likely inadvertently threatened or cornered the animal. Perhaps the diver hovered directly over the ray or floated in front of it making the stingray feel trapped against a reef without an escape route.
Because a stingray sees and swims forward easily, leave it a forward escape route. Most importantly, stay out a stingray’s striking zone, the area directly above the ray. The ray can easily strike in the area at the top of its back by arching its tail forward. By contrast, the area behind the ray’s back and the space to its sides are difficult for the ray to reach without turning its body or making swimming adjustments. Divers who are alert and aware of the stingray’s attack zone should be relatively safe.

Stingray attacks are more likely to occur to divers who are entering or exiting the ocean through shallow water and accidentally step on a stingray. Naturally the stingray will react. When the stingray is stepped on, it quickly whips its long tail forward and down, which jabs the sting at the base of the tail into the offender. This is a defensive maneuver designed to remove the diver’s foot from the stingray’s body, and it works. To avoid stepping on top of a stingray, divers can shuffle their feet when entering or exiting the water. In addition, divers should be aware of stingray habitats such as long sandy shores. Because neither dive booties nor fins protect a diver from a stingray’s hard, razor sharp sting, the diver should be vigilant if he suspects he might be in a stingray habitat.

Although the possibilities of being stung are in yiour favor, take along our Ocean Care Stingray First Aid Kit.  Everything is there to provide you immediate first aid with easy to follow directions on just what to do..Don’t get stung with out  !!

 

Article and photos courtesy of Natalie Gibb, About.com Guide

Most fire coral frequently has white tips…

Fire coral grows in familiar coral shapes. Divers have reported seeing fire coral in blade, branching, box, and even encrusting forms. As fire coral is easily confused with other corals, color is a good way to identify it. Most fire coral is a brownish-orange or brownish-green. It frequently has white tips, like the fire coral in this photo.

But if you do have an encounter with stinging fire coral, use our Ocean Care Fire Coral First Aid Kit…everything you need is in the bag..air tight, convenient to use and effective !! Don’t going diving without it !!

www.oceancaresolutions.com

photo and txt courtesy of About.com

Fire Coral..beautiful but dangerous..

Don’t learn about fire coral the hard way. Fire coral is related to jellyfish and anemones, and just like these creatures, it can really, really, sting. This Fire coral, Millepora sp., is beautiful, but dangerous.


Learn to identify fire coral and then be sure to avoid it! Divers should be on the look out for fire coral in tropical and subtropical seas. But if you do have an encounter with stinging fire coral, use our Ocean Care Fire Coral First Aid Kit…everything you need is in the bag..air tight, convenient to use and effective !! Don’t going diving without it !!

www.oceancaresolutions.com

photo and txt courtesy of About.com

Lion's Mane Jellyfish..a giant among jellyfish

Lion’s Mane Jellyfish

Image:  Dan Hershman via flickr
The lion’s mane jellyfish is a giant among jellyfish. In fact it’s the giantest of all jellyfish yet known, even if ‘giantest’ isn’t a word. They are found only in the northern hemisphere. Actually they’re found only in the northern half of the northern hemisphere, right up into the freezing waters of the Arctic. They really, really like cold water.
Lion’s mane jellyfish come in a wide variety of sizes depending on how far north they are. Those that approach the warmest waters they tolerate, around half way to the equator, are smaller and a pale orange colour. The wobbly jelly body, known as the bell, may be a mere 50 centimetres in diameter. Pff, whatever.
As we move north into colder waters, we find the lion’s mane getting darker in colour and bigger in size. Eventually they become the monstrosities we really want to see (from a safe distance) – dark crimson with a bell up to 2.5 metres (8 feet) across and tentacles trailing 120 feet behind. That’s really long by the way. Longer even than the blue whale, the biggest animal to have ever lived. I’m guessing this ridiculous size is more about getting enough food in colder seas, rather than the jellyfish having a stretch in the cold or something.
Food for this creature is anything from tiny animal plankton to small fish and other jellyfish. The lion’s mane’s (seems odd to write that) bell is arranged into 8 lobes each with 60 to 130 tentacles, adding up to lots and lots of tentacles. Naturally, they sting. Thankfully, they are not lethal to humans. Hundreds of 100 foot tentacles… I think we got lucky there. The Lion’s Mane (and now I feel like going down the pub) also has a load of arms at the centre of the tentacles. They’re much shorter and help with actually getting food into it’s mouth. That could be quite a journey!
Interestingly, a whole host of little fish swim about with the lion’s mane, escaping death by tentacle and using them for protection instead. They can even pluck out bits of food before it reaches the jellyfish’s mouth. I don’t know if the lion’s mane jellyfish is capable of getting annoyed, but if it can, that would probably do it.

OCS Jellyfish Sting Relief Solution is proven effect on a wide variety of jellyfish species including the Lion’s Mane..Safe, effective and lidocaine free, our doctor recommended 5% acetic acid solution is the best choice for first aid and pain relief…Don’t get stung without it  !!

Why use acetic acid (vinegar) on jellyfish stings?

Does vinegar work for all jellyfish stings? And how does it work?

Everyone has a theory on the best treatment for jellyfish stings -
vinegar, hot water, fresh water, urine, cold tea, warm beer.

Queensland experts advise that vinegar is best for jellyfish stings,
but not all stingers should be treated the same way, says Dr Lisa-Ann
Gershwin, director of the Australian Marine Stinger Advisory Service.

Vinegar works extremely well for box jellyfish and their tiny cousins
the irukandji, found northwards along the coast from about where the
Queensland town of Bundaberg sits, says Gershwin.  Gershwin says all
jellyfish use the same delivery systems and triggers.

These nematocysts are little capsules filled with coiled up harpoon-
like barbs.  "Picture a knife serrated on both edges to help anchor it
into its victims flesh when it fires. There's venom on both the inside
and outside of the harpoon.

The capsule has a hair trigger, which is fired mechanically by touch.
It can also be fired by changes in density or chemistry such as ph
differences, or being exposed to fresh rather than salt water.  Although
the mechanism is the same, toxins from different types of jellyfish work
in different ways , which is why some jellyfish stings are more serious
than others. Box jellyfish stings, for example, lock the heart in a
contracted state.
"A box jellyfish sting is the worst imaginable pain, says Gershwin. "It
is instantaneous and feels like boiling oil."
Irukandji stings, on the other hand, start out as a mild sting but
then suddenly cascades 20 to 30 minutes after the sting into the
potentially fatal irukandji syndrome - high blood pressure, vomiting,
body spasms and profuse sweating.  Vinegar and tropical stingers
Scientists still don't know why vinegar works for tropical stingers,
says Gershwin

"We don't know exactly what's going on chemically, so as to why it
works, it's a mystery."  "It's a fluke that we even found out, but it
does work and it works better than anything else ever tested."

According to Gershwin vinegar somehow blocks the nematocysts or stinging
cells ability to fire, "it happens instantaneously as soon as the
vinegar is applied".  "It can't do anything about those that have already
fired, but it stops any more from shooting off. In a typical sting you
get maybe 10 per cent of nematocysts firing. But on a typical tentacle
there will be many thousands that haven't fired off yet."

Rubbing the stingers or pouring fresh water on them, however, should be
avoided, as this will cause the nematocysts to fire and make the sting
much worse, says Gershwin.

"The last thing you want to do is increase your toxic load if you've
already been stung."

Dr. Lisa-Ann Gershwin, the Director of the Australian Marine Stinger 
Advisory Service was interviewed by Stuart Gary. ABC Science



			

How intelligent are jellyfish?

by Neil Kelley..

In short: Cnidarians have a simple nervous system — but given their relatively simple hardware they show surprisingly sophisticated behavior.

Jellyfish have a decentralized nervous system (nerve net) coupled with a variety of relatively sophisticated sensory organs to detect light, orientation, salinity and physical stimulus and they can respond in a rapid and coordinated manner to these stimuli [1]. Jellyfish also show evidence of habituation to repeated stimuli suggesting a capacity for information storage in their relatively simple nervous system [2]. Arguably the most sophisticated jellyfish are the cubozans (box jellyfish) which possess complex image forming eyes and are capable of navigating complicated, obstacle laden environments [3].

1 – Albert 2011 “What’s on the mind of a jellyfish? A review of behavioral observations on Aurelia sp. jellyfish” Neuroscience and Bioehavioral Reviewsdoi:10.1016/j.neubiorev.2010.06.001

2 – Johnson and Wuensch 1994 “An investigation of habituation in the jellyfish, Aurelia aurita”Behavioral and Neural Biology
doi:10.1016/S0163-1047(05)80044-5

3 – Coates et al. 2006 “The spectral sensitivity of the lens eyes of a box jellyfish”JEB 
doi: 10.1242/​jeb.02431

www.oceancaresolutions.com

Jellyfish Sting Relief Solution available now…

Don’t get stung without it !!

 

Pacific Coast Black Sea Nettle….will they be back in 2012?

The black sea nettle is considered a giant jelly; its distinctive purplish bell can reach over three feet (91 cm) in diameter; its lacy, pinkish oral arms can reach nearly 20 feet in length and its stinging tentacles 25 feet or more. It is reported to live in deeper, calmer waters but has appeared in large blooms in California coastal waters, most recently in 2010.

Giant black sea nettles appeared in droves along the San Diego shoreline in the summer of 1989. Then they mysteriously disappeared. The giant drifters reappeared again ten years later, in the summer of 1999.  It is likely that the appearance of black sea nettles in coastal California waters is also related to El Nino/La Nina events and the Red Tide.

The black sea nettle is a mysterious creature; during most years its whereabouts are unknown. Scientists just recently named this jelly in 1997, although pictures of the species were taken as early as 1926. Much about its behavior, distribution and life cycle remain a puzzle.

Be prepared..Ocean Care Solutions Jellyfish sting relief solution is safe and proven effective..Lidocaine free…don’t get stung without it !!

www.oceancaresolutions.com

 


Atlantic sea nettle or East Coast sea nettle…

Chrysaora quinquecirrha known as the Atlantic sea nettle or East Coast sea nettle is a species of jellyfish that inhabits Atlantic estuaries, such as the Chesapeake Bay. It is smaller than the Pacific sea nettle, and has more variable coloration, but is typically pale, pinkish or yellowish, often with radiating more deeply-colored stripes on the exumbrella, especially near the margin.  Click on the link for video:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Chrysaora_quinquecirrha-Sea_nettle_(jellyfish).ogg

The nettle’s sting is rated from “moderate” to “severe” and can be pernicious to smaller prey; it is not, however, potent enough to cause human death, except by allergic reaction. While the sting is not particularly harmful, it can cause moderate discomfort to any individual stung. The sting can be effectively neutralized by misting vinegar over the affected area. This keeps unfired nematocysts from firing and adding to the discomfort.

New shipment of Ocean Care Solutions’ Jellyfish sting relief solution available Nov 10th..Fast, proven effective and safe..Lidocaine Free !!

Don’t get stung without it !!