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Beachhunter.net David McRee product review of Ocean Care Solutions new Lionfish Sting 1st aid kit.

Reducing Lionfish Polulations..

Faced with a dramatic reduction of native populations of fish–which support fishing and diving recreational tourism–nearly everyone is working to reduce the lionfish populations. From spearfishing to hook and lining, any method to get them out of the water is seen as a step in the right direction. Citizen organizations like LionFishHunters and The Lionfish PSA have sprung up to educate the public and direct us toward steps necessary to control this opportunistic species.

Especially in the Florida Keys, locals are trying hard to put lionfish on the menu in seafood restaurants, hoping we can eat them into submission. Lionfish is reported to have an excellent taste and is often compared to hogfish or snapper. It’s not dangerous to eat because the poison is only contained in the spines. The meat is safe to eat.

Want to know how to clean and cook a lionfish? Here’s a great 4 minute video to show you how:

For a very well produced video by CNN on the lionfish problem, check out the 7 minute video below:

Below are some additional links to information about the Florida lionfish “invasion.”

Reef.org – Report a lionfish sighting and learn more about the whole lionfish thing, including links to some restaurants that have lionfish on the menu.

Mote Tropical Research Lab lionfish info. An excellent web site with a lot of information and links to other resources.

Content courtesy of David McRee..Beachhunter.net

http://www.blogthebeach.com/2012/nature/fish/lionfish-in-florida-problems-and-solutions

Related posts:

  1. Indo-Pacific Lionfish Threaten Florida
  2. Product Review: First Aid Kit for Marine Animal Stings: Jellyfish, Stingrays, Urchins, Fire Coral
  3. Dolphin Stranding with Happy Ending

Lionfish envenomation 1st aid kit developed by Ocean Care Solutions

Lionfish are colorful marine fish with venomous spiky fin rays. Its presence is increasing around the seas of the world and present a danger to fishermen, divers and swimmers. Its venom can lead to extreme pain, nausea, vomiting, fever, breathing difficulties, convulsions, dizziness, redness on the affected area, headaches, and numbness although its venom is rarely fatal.

This chilling animated graphic shows the population explosion of poisonous lionfish in Florida, the Caribbean, the Bahamas and the Atlantic seaboard between 1986 and 2011: http://nas.er.usgs.gov/taxgroup/fish/Lionfishanimation.gif 

Treating Lionfish Sting Injuries

Being stung by the long, thin, needle-sharp spines of even a small lionfish generally results in a fire-like pain which is often localized to the area stung, but may travel along the extremity. Expect swelling. Needless to say, a sting to the head, neck or body cavity is more serious and should be considered a medical emergency. It is possible that a portion of the spine may break off in the wound, requiring surgical intervention. Infection is always a possibility. A host of other symptoms and complications are possible.

First-aid for a lionfish sting (before you can get to a doctor) mainly consists of applying heat, which destroys the venom. The problem is, where are you going to get heat if you are out on a boat or standing on a dock?

Ocean Care Solutions has developed a lionfish sting first-aid kit that has what you need. It should be available around mid-January 2013 and will retail for around $20. The supplies contained in the kit are based on treatment protocols with scientific and medical support and derive from medical data and injury reports.
Ocean Care Solutions Lionfish Sting First-Aid Kit

What’s in the OCS Lionfish Sting First-Aid Kit?

  • Moist towelette for cleaning hands
  • Latex-free gloves
  • Gauze pad to help slow bleeding
  • Sterile saline solution for rinsing wound
  • Forceps / tweezers to remove spines
  • Instant Heat Pack to alleviate pain
  • Elastic wrap for holding heat pack in place
  • Ocean Care Solutions triple antibiotic ointment
  • Adhesive bandages

Ocean Care Solutions is a pioneer in the development of effective, convenient and affordable first-aid kits for marine sting injuries, including for jellyfish, stingrays, sea urchins, fire-coral, and Portuguese Man-of-War.

Ocean Care Solutions’ products were nominated for the 2012 World Open Water Swimming Offering of the Year.

Below are the instructions as shown on the back of the foil packet which houses the kit. Click on the image below to enlarge it enough to read:

Click image to enlarge

Content courtesy of David McRee..Beachhunter.net

http://www.blogthebeach.com/2012/nature/fish/lionfish-in-florida-problems-and-solutions

Field use report from Galveston Island Beach Patrol/Park Board Police Dept

Over this past summer season, Ocean Care Solutions, Inc. provided Chief Peter Davis and supervising staff from the Galveston Island Beach Patrol/Park Board Police Dept. (www.galvestonbeachpatrol.com) with our Stingray and Man o War Sting First Aid Kits.

Here is the e mail OCS received from Chief Davis…

We did get to use the product quite a bit, although we used saline to wash the area as opposed to vinegar, thus following the recommendations of the USLA and medical protocols set by our medical director. People really seemed to respond well to it. They liked the packaging and the way it is a self contained treatment that they could potentially carry with them “just in case”.

Hope things are good with you. We had a fairly easy season as far as stings go, but enough for all of our supervisors to be able to use the product.

Take care,
Peter

Chief Peter Davis
Galveston Island Beach Patrol/Park Board Police Dept