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Seasons change but the Portuguese Man o War never do….

As the seasons and winds change in the U.S., the Portuguese Man o War begin to arrive in large numbers.

First of all, there are no real seasons for the Man o War, as such, but because of wind currents associated with season change and weather interruptions, the Man o War is on the leading edge of those winds since it has no propulsion system other than inflating it’s crown with gas and catching the wind.

man o war..beachedTx

What is typically recognized however, is the Man o War are, as a general rule, found along and around the Florida coast lines to Pensacola from late October thru February, the largest concentration generally in Nov and Feb.; the same as Costa Rica from March to May and to some degree the 10th day after every full moon in Hawaii. There is a long history of documenting these events so it is reasonable to believe these expectations every year.

Now, if you were stung by a Man o War, you were stung by an Atlantic Portuguese Man o’ War. There is no jellyfish specie known as a Man o’ War..A MOW is a siphonophore..a colony of 4 organisms..don’t have enough time and space to detail that ..there are 3 species of Man o War but all the same if that makes sense..the Atlantic, the recently acknowledge Pacific and the Blue Bottle Man o War..the Atlantic reported to have the nastiest sting but how would one compare them as all three are very painful. They differ in size with the Atlantic the largest and the blue bottle the smallest but don’t think for an instant that changes how nasty the stings are.

The indications that you have been stung by a Man O’ War are: Stinging, burning, redness, swelling of lymph nodes. You may see long welt lines. In some people sensitive to the Man O’ War venom, there may be severe reactions, including difficulty with breathing and cardiac arrest.

The sting toxin secreted from the tentacles is a neurotoxin about seventy-five percent as powerful as cobra venom. The welts can last for minutes to hours.

Studies on the effectiveness of meat tenderizer, baking soda, papain, or commercial sprays (containing aluminum sulfate and detergents) on nematocyst stings have been contradictory. It’s possible these substances cause further damage.

Check out our OCS Man o War sting 1st aid kit is specially designed to deliver medically proven, safe and effective sting relief from the MOW. Don’t get stung without it !!

ManOWar-kit

Highly venomous jellyfish coming to a beach near you…Northeast U.S. sees Man o War

Significant blooms of venomous warm-water species of Mauve jellyfish and the Portuguese Man o War have arrived in numbers along the Atlantic east coast and north east coastal waters to the Hampton’s and beyond respectively.  both deliver potent and very painful stings.Many’s the argument as to the cause for the explosion of jellies worldwide with claims centered on global warming of sea waters is causing the biggest movement of marine species, according to a study by 17 different institutes, called Project Clamer. The Pelagia noctiluca “dominates in many areas and outbreaks have become an annual event, forcing the closing of beaches,” says the report.  “This form of jellyfish is a gluttonous predator of juvenile fish, so researchers consider its spread a harmful trend.”However, there was further bad news as the report also warned that the highly-venomous Portuguese Man O’War is also moving closer and in abundance.

Physalia physalis; a jellyfish-like creature (really a 4 organism siphonophore) usually found in subtropical waters, is more regularly being discovered in northern Atlantic waters as recently as the holiday weekend in Martha’s Vineyard of the Massachusetts coast.  Likely driven by warm current and winds not seen since 2006, the Man o War is not typically found this far north.  It is not uncharacteristic to see the Lion’s Mane, another nasty stinger, in the cooler waters typical to the northern shores now in addition to these animals.

ManOWar-kit

It might be time to buy yourself a new pair of jelly shoes for the beach or take along OCS Jellyfish Sting Relief spray and/or  our MOW 1st Kit…We hope you don’t need it but if you do, you will be glad you have it..The Solution for marine sting injuries…Don’t get stung without it!!

 

Jellyfish facts…Everything you need to know…

Jellyfish are categorized due to their characteristics. The different species of jellyfish are the Red Type which is also known as the ‘China type’ can be identified as Rhopilema esculentum. These jellyfish are slightly reddish with a 12-24 inch diameter smooth umbrella.

The jellyfish is a popular seafood in eastern and southern Asian nations where there is a high market demand that stimulates large-scale jellyfish production. Due to its economic importance in China, many biological studies have focused on the jellyfish Rhopilema esculentum Kishinouye in terms of the environmental impact of aquaculture activities and culture techniques. In recent years, the commercial aquaculture of R. esculentum has expanded greatly in China

Key Lab of Marine Environmental Science and Ecology, Ministry of Education, Ocean University of China, Qingdao, 266100, China
Photo..M Kawahara

New jellyfish species discovered on Gold Coast..Australia

ABC News Gold Coast  

A curious child from Paradise Point is responsible for the discovery of a new species of box jellyfish found in a local canal.  Nine-year-old Saxon Thomas found the new species when fishing in his backyard canal.  Scientists have now confirmed the jellyfish is a new scientific discovery.

But Australian Marine Stinger Advisory services director Lisa Gershwin says there is a lot more to learn about it.  “We’re still trying to name it,” Ms Gershwin says.

“I haven’t met Saxon yet but my intention is to one of these days when I meet him ask him what he would like it to be named… I wanna give him the choice to name it because I think it’s such a wonderful thing that here’s these kids out playing with nature and going ‘hey wait, that’s different – what’s that?’ – and now we know. What a fabulous find.”

Queensland Museum’s marine expert Doctor Merrick Ekins has examined the jellyfish.

“A new species is always very exciting. We’ve got a bit more work to do to work out exactly what it is… but it’s definitely in the same family as the box jellyfish. But it’s not THE box jellyfish which is a big relief,” Dr Ekins says.

“The first thing we did was to make sure it wasn’t thechironex fleckeri box jellyfish that’s infamous for killing people, because if that’s suddenly appearing down here on the Sunshine Coast and Gold Coast then that would be a real issue for swimmers.”

However, it is not yet known if this new species is dangerous in its own way.

“We don’t know about that… whether it gives you a sting is most likely. It’s probably not life threatening but we don’t know.”

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Jellyfish Facts…The “Pink Meanie”

Meet the “pink meanie,” a new species of jellyfish discovered by scientists at Dauphin Island Sea Lab and the University of California, Merced.From Discovery News–On the surface, this brightly colored jellyfish may not appear to be particularly extraordinary. According to DNA and morphological analysis, however, this marine animal, Drymonema larsoni, is not only a new species of jellyfish, but also a new family.

Found in the waters of the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean, the pink meanie is the first new scyphozoan family discovered since 1921.

“It’s rare that something like this could escape the notice of scientific research for so long,” Keith Bayha, a scientist at at Dauphin Island Sea Lab, said in a press release. “That it did is partially due to Drymonema‘s extreme rarity almost everywhere in the world.”

Discovery News

Photo: Jellyfish facts....#52....Meet the “pink meanie,” a new species of jellyfish discovered by scientists at Dauphin Island Sea Lab and the University of California, Merced.</p>
<p>From Discovery News--On the surface, this brightly colored jellyfish may not appear to be particularly extraordinary. According to DNA and morphological analysis, however, this marine animal, Drymonema larsoni, is not only a new species of jellyfish, but also a new family.</p>
<p>Found in the waters of the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean, the pink meanie is the first new scyphozoan family discovered since 1921.</p>
<p>“It’s rare that something like this could escape the notice of scientific research for so long,” Keith Bayha, a scientist at at Dauphin Island Sea Lab, said in a press release.  “That it did is partially due to Drymonema‘s extreme rarity almost everywhere in the world.”</p>
<p>Discovery News

Dive Flag App Travels, Shop & Product Reviews

Product Review – Jellyfish Sting Relief Solution

About Ocean Care Solutions

Ocean Care Solutions’ (OCS) first aid products were developed by Kevin, a certified scuba diver. Kevin noticed that there was no convenient, proven medically effective, first aid products for stings from the Lionfish, the Man of War, the Sea Urchin, the Stingray, Fire Coral and Jellyfish. For two years Kevin consulted with international marine science and emergency medical communities to develop what they refer to as ‘the definitive Gold Standard’ for sea sting injuries. All OCS’s products have been developed without the reliance of myths, home remedies or guesswork.
Ron at OCS got in contact with Dive Flag App in a hope to have their product reviewed and publicized to Scuba Divers around the world. After initial discussions OCS sent us, here at Dive Flag App, a package containing a few hundred samples to test and distribute to other Dive Flag App members.  Today we had the opportunity to test their most ‘popular’ product the Jellyfish Sting Relief Solution (JSR Solution). This was a timely arrangement as Australia is currently experiencing an outbreak of jellyfish including the Blue Blubber Jellyfish (common name).

Product Description – Jellyfish Sting Relief Solution

OCS’s JSR Solution was developed to neutralize the stinging cells of jellyfish. The solution suspends any remaining pain causing nematocysts (stinging cells) from firing.  The directions of use are as follows:
  1.  Rinse the injury with salt water only,
  2.  Shake the spray and simultaneously press down on the top to pump the solution,
  3.  Apply the safe JSR Solution for 3-5 minutes, and then
  4.  Simply scrape away the pain.  Re-apply if necessary.
The application of the JSR solution is to ‘de-activate’ the jellyfish stinging cells. For the best results it is recommended that you apply the JSR Solution as soon as possible after having been stung. Delay in the use of this product limits effectiveness.
The JSR Solution comes in a small and convenient spray bottle made with medically recommended 5% acetic acid for the best results.

Product Trial

Dive Flag App were naturally skeptical about the effectiveness of OCS’s JSR Solution and so we decided to test the product out. Before reading further it is important to note that Dive Flag App did so under the supervision of trained emergency personnel and in no way is Dive Flag App suggesting that other members perform the following test.
Frank Vorster located two Blue Blubber Jellyfish in the Gold Coast Seaway, Queensland, Australia. He proceeded to sting himself in two ‘similar’ locations by lightly pressing up against the tentacles of the two jellyfish as they floated by. To one location he applied the JSR Solution and to the other he applied nothing. Eager to test the product out – others part-took in the experiment too.

Observations

  1. Within one minute, the stinging sensation on the hand with the JSR Solution started to subside whilst the second location’s continued to intensify as more stinging cells activated.
  2. After five minutes the stinging sensation on the location with the JSR Solution had all but faded completely, whilst the stinging sensation of the second location continued.
  3. Frank wiped the location with the JSR Solution as directed. The location where he had applied the JSR Solution appeared unaffected. Whilst having  wiped off the second location in a similar fashion had only activated the remaining stinging cells, effectively reactivating the sting.
  4. For a further 25 minutes Frank felt the stinging sensation on the second location whilst the location where the JSR Solution was applied felt “like it was never stung”.

Product Review

The JSR Solution performed as OCS had claimed. The product was easy to apply and immediately effective. The quality is guaranteed by OCS’s Californian manufacturing facility. A single 1oz bottle can be used to relieve 4 stings and the 4oz bottle can relieve up to 12 stings. With a shelf life of over 2 years the product can be stored without concern.
  • Price: 5/5
  • Effectiveness: 5/5
  • Quality: 5/5
  • Product Recommendation: Don’t get stung without it! Don’t go diving without it!
Dive Flag App highly recommend that all beach going, water sport activists and especially scuba divers keep a bottle of the solution in their bag. The product is incredible effective and useful.

Where to Buy the Product

Dive Flag App is so impressed with the effectiveness of the solution, we have worked out an arrangement with Ocean Care Solutions to become the exclusive distributor for these products. Dive Flag App is currently developing an on-line store where you can buy the product. If you would like a sample, to purchase some units for personal use or become a retailer for these products, simply email us for more information: info@diveflagapp.com .

Blessed Diving,

Dive Flag App
www.diveflagapp.com
info@diveflagapp.com
www.facebook.com/diveflagapp

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Ocean Care Solutions Does Its Lion Share Of Work

 

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 18, 2012

Posted by Steve Munatones

Ocean Care Solutions Does Its Lion Share Of Work

Ron Adley announced a new Ocean Care Solutions for Lionfish Kit. “The kit will be available by January 15th. It is another product in our increasing line of marine sting products including a newly formulated jellyfish sting relief spray.”Lionfish are colorful marine fish with venomous spiky fin rays. Its presence is increasing around the seas of the world and present a danger to fishermen, divers and swimmers. Its venom can lead to extreme pain, nausea, vomiting, fever, breathing difficulties, convulsions, dizziness, redness on the affected area, headaches, and numbness although its venom is rarely fatal.

As Adley knows well from his travels, lionfish stings can produce discomfort over several days as well as severe allergic reactions that can cause breathing difficulties, swelling of the tongue, and slurred speech.

Ocean Care Solutions‘ products were nominated for the 2012 World Open Water Swimming Offering of the Year.The nomination of Ocean Care Solutions reads, “Care is its middle name. Ocean Care Solutions is working hard to help stem the tide of the pain and discomfort caused by stinging organisms. Its products enable comforting relief from a number of jellyfish, Portuguese man o war, sea urchins, fire coral and stingrays.

Ocean Care Solutions goes beyond supplying a wide range of first aid kits that are widely acclaimed the world over. It provides information, a constant source of education about the global proliferation of jellyfish in the world’s oceans.

For its desire to relief pain by working directly with the stakeholders in the open water swimming world, for its wide range of soothing solutions, for its sharing of information about the sea stingers that are a growing menace in the aquatic world, the Ocean Care Solutions line-up is a worthy nominee for the 2012 WOWSA Open Water Swimming Offering of the Year.”

Copyright © 2012 by Open Water Source

The Mangrove jellyfish…

Mangrove jelly fish (Cassiopea xamachana) is so called because it is mostly found in the roots of mangroves in the southern Gulf of Mexico, Caribbean, and other tropical waters. They are also called the Upside Down jellyfish because they tend to settle upside down in muddy and shallow waters. On first sight, they do not really resemble a jellyfish, instead looking more like a sea anemone, or a bluish green flower on the waterbed. However, this appearance also provides the jellyfish with very effective camouflage and protects it from likely predators.

The jellyfish catches it food, mostly plankton and zooplankton, when it gets paralyzed by these stinging cells. The mangrove jellyfish also have venom filled nematocysts on its tentacles for the same purpose of stinging its prey and then transporting it near the mouth for ingestion. You may be surprised to know that unlike other jellyfish, the mangrove jellyfish does not have only a single mouth. In fact, it has mutated to form a number of secondary mouths. The primary mouth reduces the food into tiny fragments, which are then ingested by these numerous secondary mouths.

As far as humans are concerned, they are most likely to be caught up in the mucus columns in the water that contain stinging cells of the mangrove jellyfish. The stinging cells are slightly toxic in nature and can cause severe itching. However, if a human disturbs an entire swarm of mangrove jellyfish, they will all launch upwards towards the surface of the water together and release more stinging cells into the water. This situation can be vary dangerous to humans.

Ocean Care Solutions..the solution for marine sting injuries…

 

Lethal stings from the Australian box jellyfish could be treated with zinc

Box jellyfish of the Chironex species are among the most venomous animals in the world, capable of killing humans with their sting. Their venom, though, which kills by rapidly punching holes in human red blood cells, can be slowed down by administering zinc, according to research published December 12 in the open access journal PLOS ONE by Angel Yanagihara from the University of Hawaii and colleagues.

The researchers developed ways to extract venom from the jellyfish, and tested it on human blood and on mice. They found that the venom created pores in human red blood cells, making them leak large amounts of potassium, which causes cardiac arrest and death.

As Yanagihara elaborates, “For over 60 years researchers have sought to understand the horrifying speed and potency of the venom of the Australian box jellyfish, arguably the most venomous animal in the world. We have found that a previously disregarded hemolysin can cause an avalanche of reactions in cells. This includes an almost instantaneous, massive release of potassium that can cause acute cardiovascular collapse and death.”

This shows an Australian box jellyfish.

Yanagihara AA, Shohet RV (2012) Cubozoan Venom-Induced Cardiovascular Collapse Is Caused by Hyperkalemia and Prevented by Zinc Gluconate in Mice. PLoS ONE 7(12): e51368. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0051368

(Photo Credit: Robert Hartwick)

The authors treated the cells with a zinc compound which inhibits this process, and found that the treatment could slow the pore-forming process in cells, and increased survival times in the mice treated with the compound, zinc gluconate. The research suggests that the venom’s capacity to increase potassium levels is what makes it so dangerous, and that rapid administration of zinc may be a potential life-saver in human sting victims.

Anatomical facts about jellyfish…

The Jellyfish body consists of over 95% water; most of their umbrella mass is a gelatinous material—the jelly—called mesoglea which is surrounded by two layers of protective skin.  The top layer is called the epidermis, and the inner layer is referred to as gastrodermis, which lines the gut.  Jellyfish do not have specialized digestive, osmoregulatory, central nervous, respiratory or circulatory systems.

Jellyfish have no brain or central nervous system, but employ a loose network of nerves, located in the epidermis, which is called a “nerve net”.  Jellyfish have limited control over movement, but can use their hydrostatic skeleton to navigate through contraction-pulsations of the bell-like body; some species actively swim most of the time, while others are mostly passive.

Although counter to the “brainless jellyfish” hypothesis is that some species explicitly adapt to tidal flux to control their location. In Roscoe Bay. B.C., jellyfish ride the current at ebb tide until they hit a gravel bar, and then descend below the current. They remain in still waters waiting for the tide to rise, ascending and allowing it to sweep them back into the bay. They monitor salinity to avoid fresh water from mountain snow melt, again by diving until they find enough salt.

Some jellyfish also have ocelli: light-sensitive organs that do not form images but which can detect light, and are used to determine up from down, responding to sunlight shining on the water’s surface. These are generally pigment spot ocelli, which have some cells (not all) pigmented.

Certain species of jellyfish, such as the Box jellyfish, have been revealed to be more advanced than their counterparts. The Box jellyfish has 24 eyes, two of which are capable of seeing color, and four parallel brains that act in competition, supposedly making it one of the only creatures to have a 360 degree view of its environment.  It is suggested that the two eyes that contain cornea and retina are attached to a central nervous system which enables the four brains to process images. It is unknown how this works, as this animal has a unique central nervous system.

Information and  photo courtesy wikipedia..